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David Thomas Sr
12-30-2010, 01:01 PM
Had my steam engine running on air last weekend ran great on 100 psi at 500 rpm at50% intake duration. When I went to 130 psi and 800 rpm the intake cam follower bearings failed so I had to completely redesign the intake operating mechanism. Hope to have it back running this weekend. The displacement at 50% intake is 12.4 cubic inches this is the actual displacement plus a couple of ci's for emty space at 500 rpm I will need 6,200 cubic inches of steam per minute 372,000 cubic inches per hour. Can anybody tell me how much water and what temperature it takes at 100psi and at 150psi. I will post some pictures when I have it back in operation.


Thanks
Dave Thomas Sr.

TonyRabbitlaser
12-30-2010, 01:40 PM
100 psi will be 338 degrees F. 150 psi will be 366 degrees F. I'm pretty sure at 100 psi you'll need about 6.64 GPH and at 150 psi you'll need 9.41GPH. I would suggest a closed loop steam system that way you won't need a lot of water and it will take less energy to keep it heated.

David Thomas Sr
12-31-2010, 08:23 AM
Thanks for the info Tony

Dave Sr.

David Thomas Sr
01-08-2011, 09:11 PM
The steam engine is up and running again after a redesign of the intake valve operating mechanism. Had it running at 800 rpm on 100 psi air. It produced 77ft.lbs. static torque at 100psi with a digital scale. I now have it mounted on a metal frame and I will be connecting it to an alternator from a chevy S10. I'm hoping it will have enough power to run it at full load. When this motor ran on gas it powered a homemade buzz saw that I built. The buzz saw is now froze down to the ground covered with snow I will dig it out in the spring and see if the steam engine with its superior lugging power will run it better. I have started building a multi tube water tube boiler that should be safe and fairly easy to build. With rising gas prices I think the steam engine will be making a comeback. Here are some of the practical uses I can see for them powering a buzz saw, a stationary chain saw, a hydraulic pump on a wood splitter, generating electricity, and someday a practical steam powered auto.
For more info you can call me at 319-462-3327 between the hours of 8:00 AM and 2:00 PM central time or email service@thomas-superwheel.com

David Thomas Sr
01-10-2011, 12:58 PM
The steam engine is now mounted on its steel frame and connected to the alternator. I wasn't sure if it would produce enough power at full load but it did much better than I expected. With the alternator running three times the engine speed connected to a dead battery to put it under full load. On 100psi the engine runs 800 RPM with no load at full load it dropped to 400 RPM and the alternator produced 13.4 volts to the battery. On 120psi the engine ran 1000 RPM unloaded and dropped to 800 RPM at full load the alternator produced 14.6 volts. I then tried it at full pressure 140 psi the engine under full load ran 1000 RPM and the alternator produced 15.2 volts I didn't try it unloaded. It looks like 120psi gives the best results. Now I have to figure out a way to govern ether the pressure or the volume of steam or air because as the battery becomes charged the load decreases any suggestions would be appreciated. Also what type of oil is used in a steam engine oiler? Does anybody have any plans for building a simple oiler. I will post some more pictures in a future post.

"theirs never enough time to do it right but theirs always enough time to do it over"

awemawson
01-10-2011, 01:13 PM
If the battery is truely dead, the charging voltage is not a good measure of the power you are generating. A dead battery will be sulphated and as such present a high resistance and take little charge, however the voltage will rise rapidly. You need to measure the current flowing into the battery as well as the voltage. Product of voltage times current will give you the power.

David Thomas Sr
01-11-2011, 07:08 PM
Thanks for the input Andrew. I was born in the UK in Ipswich I came to the US in 1957. I remember riding on many steam trains back then. I went back for a visit two years ago things had changed a lot.
I will be adding an amp meter and volt meter to the steam engine as soon as I get time also I will replace the battery with a new one and connect a head lamp bulb to discharge the battery and add more load. Thanks again and keep in touch. I would also like to hear from anybody who has built or is interested in building a steam engine.

Dave Sr.

awemawson
01-12-2011, 04:40 AM
Thanks for the input Andrew. I was born in the UK in Ipswich I came to the US in 1957. I remember riding on many steam trains back then. I went back for a visit two years ago things had changed a lot.
I will be adding an amp meter and volt meter to the steam engine as soon as I get time also I will replace the battery with a new one and connect a head lamp bulb to discharge the battery and add more load. Thanks again and keep in touch. I would also like to hear from anybody who has built or is interested in building a steam engine.

Dave Sr.

In the early 1960's a fellow called Dr Richard Beeching in his role as chairman of British Rail cut masses of network track, mainly branch lines, and moved from steam to diesel. So you'd be hard pushed to see a steam train now other than on a preserved track. Our rail network was utterly run down at the time as it hadn't recovered from WW11 and we were broke having been taken to the cleaners by the US over Lend Lease.

UUU
01-12-2011, 07:56 AM
A steam engine uses steam oil! Usually available in two types, thicker stuff for superheated engines.

Injected into the steam supply using a small pump, or with a "displacement" lubricator.

Some of the oil will pass into the steam exhaust. If you're condensing the steam and reusing the water, you'll need to prevent the oil from passing into the boiler.

pauluk
01-12-2011, 11:29 AM
Hi David
It looks like in interesting project you have on the go. steam engines use either a mechanical lubricator (oil pump) which you can buy off the shelf, Take a look on page 47 of
http://www.pollymodelengineering.co.uk/sections/bruce-engineering/docs/cat_may10.pdf
or a hydrostatic or displacement lubricator. In its simplest for this is just a reservoir on the main stream pipe which is filled with oil. Water condenses in the reservoir which displaces the oil into the steam pipe. A couple of suggestions for you to consider. I am guessing the finned area of the engine is the cylinder in which case I would lag this area with some sort of insulation. Steam condensing in the cylinders will kill your efficiency, so having a finned cylinder will cause you problems. I don’t know if you have fitted a drain valve to the cylinder but you will probably need one. When starting from cold steam will condense into water until the engine warms up, the water being incompressible can then hydraulically lock the engine. To overcome this most steam engines have a drain valve in the cylinder to vent the water. The valve is left open when the engine is started from cold, and closed once it has warmed up.
Good luck with the project keep us posted
Regards

Paul

RomanLini
01-12-2011, 08:09 PM
...
I don’t know if you have fitted a drain valve to the cylinder but you will probably need one. When starting from cold steam will condense into water until the engine warms up, the water being incompressible can then hydraulically lock the engine. To overcome this most steam engines have a drain valve in the cylinder to vent the water. The valve is left open when the engine is started from cold, and closed once it has warmed up.
...

Another common technique was a small lever that holds both the inlet and exhaust valves open, then the steam was run through the cylinder until the cylinder was up to temp and no more water vapour comes out the exhaust. After that point the engine can be started.

pauluk
01-17-2011, 04:31 PM
Hi
Are you going to fit a superheater to the boiler??