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View Full Version : Need Help! Electrode Machining



Mouldman
10-25-2010, 11:09 AM
I'd like to hear peoples solutions to graphite electrode machining. We currently use one of our Takuumi CNC machines to machine our electrodes both copper and graphite and I am worried about the longterm damage to the machine and the graphite that gets in to the coolant plugs the filters very quickly. We need a low cost solution to machining these electrodes though as is is not a fulltime usage of the machine. Does anyone know of small machines with vacuum attachments or some other solution?

3D Accuracy
10-25-2010, 08:03 PM
Hello Mouldman,

I'm not familiar with the coolant plumbing on your machine but would there be a way for you to easily and inexpensively re-route the coolant and pre-filter it before returning it to the machine? Running it through some sort of cheap cloth may remove a good percentage of the graphite and would allow you to easily dispose of the sludge. This would also keep it out of the more expensive machine filters.

I know from past experience making molds that graphite dust control can be a headache. I hope you find a good solution.

Have a terrific day!
Robert
3D Accuracy

Mouldman
10-26-2010, 07:45 AM
Thanks 3D, I am looking in to this possibility too.

SORCHEROR
10-26-2010, 08:40 AM
you need a vacumm system,or at least a very good shop vac,one with a heppa filter
i cover my table with dirty aprons use a cardboard box big enough to cover my vise and not get in way of spinlde,cut the bottom out to fit over the vise,this makes a good vacumm shroud,than i make a hole for the hose and secure it all,thats the best you can do on a budget,works well,now i have a torrit blower system,good luck

SORCHEROR
10-26-2010, 08:43 AM
oh,i see your flodding coolant on it? extemely messy and bad for the machine,the coolant will go every where bringing the abrassive graphite with it,will get in your guards and even into your ways eventually,and what a mess to clean up,we dont do that anymore
and im not sure the graphite EDM's the same with coolant absorbed into it,cut it dry with a shop vac

Mouldman
10-26-2010, 04:42 PM
We have tried running coolant in the past but we are actually running dry now. It is just that the vacuum is not cleaning everything and when we do eventually run coolant in the machine it still gets graphite in to the system. I am looking for either a dedicated system if we can afford it or at least a better vacuum system to keep the graphite out of the machine better and still be able to remove it to go back to other materials.

Andre' B
10-26-2010, 05:43 PM
Our electrodes tend to be small so.
We mounted a 3R chuck on a pedistal about 6" tall.
When milling electrodes we put an 8" diameter plastic pipe over it, the top of the pipe is just below the top of the electrode.
A 4" hose connects to the 8" pipe down low, the hose goes to a 1500 CFM vacum system.
Vary little dust gets away.

3D Accuracy
10-27-2010, 07:49 AM
Our electrodes tend to be small so.
We mounted a 3R chuck on a pedistal about 6" tall.
When milling electrodes we put an 8" diameter plastic pipe over it, the top of the pipe is just below the top of the electrode.
A 4" hose connects to the 8" pipe down low, the hose goes to a 1500 CFM vacum system.
Vary little dust gets away.

Hey Andre' B,

This looks like a very good solution for cutting dry if you have the vacuum system!

Have a terrific day!
Robert
3D Accuracy

SORCHEROR
10-27-2010, 08:33 AM
same as my box setup,a shroud will help,but i found the biggest help was to cover the table with aprons or rags,and carefully fold them up keeping the dust in them after your done,i found i big help is to clean the machine and dry it with rags before you start cutting trodes,wet machine the dust sticks like clue,and wipe the machine down after cutting,ive been doing it for years and been working good,even before my vacumm system,a good shop vac is a must!!!for $100 bucks you can get one with a good filter
if you cut small trodes and keep the hose mounted close to the trode you dont even need the box setup,i use a magnet with a post or screw sticking up and tie the hose to it