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acondit
05-10-2005, 07:03 PM
I have been lurking for a while and decided that it is time to get started.

I am building a CNC router. Due to lots of different comments I am downsizing my first machine. I started to build a metal framed router but I decided to build an MDF router first.

I have resisted spinning my motors so far.
I have a bunch of Thomson linear rails and bearings, so I am going to use them instead of black pipe.

My X-axis and Y-axis will both have 1" rails and bearings mounted on Thomson rail stand-offs. My X-axis rails are 48" long and my Y-axis rails are 32 1/2" long.

My Z-axis rails are 3/4" x 18".

I have mounted my X-axis rails on the MDF base piece. There are two SPB-16OPN on each side connected by a pieces of 1/2" x 5" x 34 1/2" 6061 Aluminum.

{Edit}
I added a picture of my design. I still have to figure out the stepper mounting.
{End Edit}

Alan

acondit
06-15-2005, 12:01 PM
I have started putting together the gantry. I am still trying to figure out how to insure that my top surface (work table) is precisely parallel to my bottom surface (rail mounting). I am thinking about leveling my Y-axis rails in relation to my bottom surface and using a router mounted on a temporary fixture sliding on the Y-axis to machine the precise height of the end supports (MDF at ends of X-axis rails). Any suggestions?

the_paco
06-15-2005, 12:40 PM
Hi acondit!

How about not to bother yourself with this aspect and just machine your sacrifial table top (?MDF?) once your rails (Xs and Ys) are parallel, straight and maybe leveled? I have a different machine but that's how I do it whenever I installed a new spoilboard or when I re-surface it every couple of days. Once you had it machined, you can adjust the Z (according to the ridges left if there's any)...

Maybe I'm missing something about your setup though...

Can I inquire your source for Thomson rails?

acondit
06-15-2005, 01:36 PM
The_Paco,

I bought the thomson rails and bearings on E-bay. I bought a unit that included a pair of 66 inch rails, supports, 4 bearings and a mounting plate. Then I bought an individual rail that was 48" with two bearings and supports. Then I bought a couple short rails, supports and 4 more bearings. I cut one of the 66 inch rails down to 48" and cut the other one in half to give me two 32 1/2 inchers after finishing the ends. I am hoping that I will end up with a cutting area that is just slightly larger than 36" by 24".

I have been gathering parts for over a year and finally got to where I think I have most of the hard to obtain things that I need.

I may end up having to just mount the top surface and machine the cutting area but I am hoping that I can get the whole surface pretty close to parallel so that I don't have to lose the hard surface of the MDF for a work surface.

Peace,
acondit

acondit
06-21-2005, 11:48 PM
While I am trying to figure out some of the other stuff I made an Acme tap out of a piece of my Acme threaded rod, so that I can tap some plastic drive blocks. I set it up in my dividing head and milled four flutes in it and then cleaned them up with a jeweler's file.
Alan

mxtras
06-22-2005, 05:06 PM
Pretty creative on the tap!

Nice thread so far! Keep us posted.

Scott

acondit
06-25-2005, 12:37 PM
I am building a torsion box to support the top layer of MDF. I used 1/2" baltic birch for the runners. I am using 1/4" Luan plywood for the two skins. I glued on the first skin and am about ready to glue on the second skin.

Before I glue on the second skin though, I think that I will mount the box in the frame. I am thinking about drilling through the end supports and using about 4 1/4" T-nuts on the inside of each end. I don't see any way to install the T-nuts after I glue the skin on. I guess I could cut a few access holes through the skin but I would rather not have to.

acondit
07-01-2005, 02:09 PM
I realized that to get a good surface, I need to have the x-axis rails parallel and in the same plane. The fact that my gantry travels smoothly down the rails would seem to indicate that they are parallel and in the same plane but what I hadn't considered was the amount of flex in the bottom MDF sheet. When I placed a machinest level on opposite rails they weren't level and weren't level with each other. What to do? :idea:

Well I decided that I needed a good work surface that was large enough to sit the router base on, that I could level in both x and y directions.

Since I was planning to build a larger router after I finish this one, I decided that the base frame for that router would be a good surface to build this one on. So I have started the frame for router two before finishing router one.

I had some good adjusting screws that I removed from a Navy surplus rack cabinet. They should make good adjusters for this frame.

I built the two long sides first, ensuring as well as possible, that the legs were square to the rails and all in the same plane, then welded them up.
Then I welded on the adjusters. This allows me to square up the whole frame. Then using a machinists level on the top rails, I am able to get the top surfaces of the rails level within 0.0005 / 10". Then by putting in the cross rails and leveling the frame all the way around and squaring the corners, I should have a level top surface for later mounting the rails for the larger router.

This should provide a good working surface for finishing construction of the MDF router.

Alan

acondit
07-05-2005, 08:03 PM
Here is the Acme nut. It works fine. I had to put it in the freezer three times though before I could cut enough to let it turn without too much resistance.

acondit
07-05-2005, 10:15 PM
I got my 2nd router frame welded up. It seems to be nice and square. I was able to get the surface leveled in both directions with a machinist level. So, I should now have a good surface to use to put together my MDF router.

I built the frame around the MDF router which was sitting on saw horses. When I finished the outer frame, I lifted the MDF router up onto it and finished the rest of the frame under it.

acondit
07-06-2005, 11:01 AM
I have started mounting the Y-Axis rails. I leveled them in relation to my base board. I intend to mount my machining surface parallel to my base board. I will mount my torsion box (minus top skin) between the end boards as close to parallel to the base as I can get it.

Then I will use the router to take a light surface cut across the tops of the torsion members to insure flatness. In order to do this, I plan to use the router mounted on a temporary fixture that slides on the Y-Axis to insure that the top of the torsion box is flat before I glue on the top skin.

The problem is that my fixture has to be reversible so that I can reach both ends of the torsion box. The one end is basically no problem, but I still have to figure out how to reach the end at the back of the gantry. I have one idea but does anyone else have any ideas?

Peace,
Alan

acondit
07-08-2005, 11:45 AM
I am in the process of mounting the torsion box. I created spacers to make the bottom of the torsion box parallel to the top of the base board.

I am going to drill 4 holes in each end and use 4 T-nuts on the inside of the torsion box at each end for mounting. Then when I glue on the top skin, I should be able to fasten the torsion box in place without having to drill access holes.

Alan

buscht
07-08-2005, 11:49 AM
Then I will use the router to take a light surface cut across the tops of the torsion members to insure flatness. In order to do this, I plan to use the router mounted on a temporary fixture that slides on the Y-Axis to insure that the top of the torsion box is flat before I glue on the top skin.

The problem is that my fixture has to be reversible so that I can reach both ends of the torsion box. The one end is basically no problem, but I still have to figure out how to reach the end at the back of the gantry. I have one idea but does anyone else have any ideas?


I don't think that you have to worry about reaching the back end of the gantry. If the router won't reach, then you won't be cutting there in real life anyways. Just ignore it and work out in the front section.

If you are worried about the step, then mount a piece of 1/4" hardboard to the front area of the torsion box and skin cut that flat.

Your project looks very good!
Trent

acondit
07-29-2005, 01:03 AM
I cut a piece of 1/2 inch 6160 aluminum 6" wide by 9 1/8" long. Then I layed out all the holes for the Thompson linear bearings (16 holes No. 21), (4) 5/16" holes for bolting the Z-axis to the Y-Axis and 2 quarter inch holes for alignment dowels. Then I drilled all the holes on my Mill-Drill. I tapped the 16 holes for the bearings to 10-32 and the four holes for Z-Axis mounting to 3/8x16.

I mounted in to the Thomson bearings and it slides great.

It really is flat even if the picture doesn't look like it.

acondit
08-02-2005, 06:18 PM
Well after I got the mounting plate for the z-axis done, I hung the router from a temporary plate and ran it along the tops of all the ribs. So the top should be flat with in a few thousandths. Right now the top skin is glued and clamped in place and starting to dry.

Now I have to build the z-axis and mount all of the screws and motors.

Yea!

ger21
08-02-2005, 10:52 PM
So the top should be flat with in a few thousandths.

The top is only as straight as your rails. Are you sure your rails are flat and parallel to within a few thousandths? :)

acondit
08-03-2005, 12:42 AM
Gerry,


The top is only as straight as your rails. Are you sure your rails are flat and parallel to within a few thousandths? :)

My x-axis and y-axis rails are 1" Thomson linear rails on Thomson supports. I leveled the base in both directions with a machinist level (0.0005/10"). Then I checked the rails for level.

No, I am not sure that they are flat and parallel, but they are as close to flat and parallel as I could get them.

This is a prototype machine before I build my bigger machine. I don't expect the MDF to hold the tolerances that I hope for on my next one. However, I hope to be able to use it to produce better parts for the next one.

Thanks for asking,
Alan

acondit
09-03-2005, 11:33 PM
I got my Shumatech DRO-350 finished and installed on my mill-drill. It sure makes working on things easier. I don't think that I could have gotten all of the holes lined up properly without the DRO. I still have a bunch of work to do on my Z-axis but it is going quicker now.

I decided to use the bronze nut that I ordered from MSC when I ordered the acme screw stock. I still have to machine the block to thread the nut into it will be my first try turning internal threads. I also have about a dozen more holes to drill and tap on my end supports and my bearing blocks.

Wish me luck,
Alan

ViperTX
09-05-2005, 12:34 AM
I've been 'eye-balling' the drillings on the parts for my gantry-router....I keep avoiding the cost of the DRO since I plan to eventually CNC the mill-drill.....so, it's been slow and painful.

acondit...looks like you're doing an exceptional job!

acondit
09-08-2005, 01:54 PM
I got the Z-axis assembled and used my electric drill to move it back and forth.

I machined an aluminum block to screw the bronze Acme nut into. Only a few minor screw-ups on the internal threading. Luckily, they were very minor and didn't ruin the job. Luckily I checked my measurements about three times before I started. I thought the nut was threaded 15/16x18 but it was actually 1"x18. I guess for an internal thread that error would also have been recoverable unlike an external thread that is too small.

Next I have to machine and mount the X and Y screws. Then I have to figure out my motor mounts. I feel like I am getting close.

Alan

acondit
09-21-2005, 10:54 PM
I have started working on the Y-Axis screw. I machined the left end rail support to accept two bearings to act as thrust bearings. I turned the end of the screw to 0.500" for the thickness of the block and then approximately 3/4" of 1/2"x20 thread for the lock nuts and about a 0.375" stub for about 1" for the motor coupler or pulley.

Alan

Halfnutz
09-21-2005, 11:30 PM
Nice work. Isnt that DRO sweet? I just put one on my mill/drill too and I love it. I regret not having it when I built my last router. It really would have been a big help. Its too bad the things are so expensive, nowadays stuff like that should be less expensive. Supply/demand I geusse.

Nice design, keep up the pics, how about some of your shop and tools?

(The above comments are the authors and do not represent the oppinions of CNCZone or its management.)

acondit
10-17-2005, 09:16 PM
I finally got a few minutes to machine the Y-axis nut and mount it to the traveling plate.

I used a small 4-jaw mounted in the 3-jaw to hold it. That way I didn't have to unmount the 3-jaw and remount the 8" 4-jaw, which is a little bit overkill for a block that is only about 2" square.

You can see one of the disadvantages of buying parts on e-bay. I got two supports that are anodized and two that aren't.

Then I stuck the Y-axis back up on the gantry.

Next thing to do is machine and install the X-axis screw and fittings, then mount the motors. It feels like I'm getting closer.

Yeah!

ViperTX
10-17-2005, 10:20 PM
acondit,
When you machined the ends of the ballscrews did you heat the ends to soften them? I tried to face the end of my ballscrew, so I could center drill it.....the facing sorta worked....looks like it polished the end.....and I wouldn't center drill the ballscrew......I was using a HSS center drill....looks like it just polished the center.

acondit
10-17-2005, 11:56 PM
ViperTx,

On this machine I am using 3/4" x 5 precision ACME screws and I was able to cut them with a regular HSS/M2 cutting tool without annealing the end of the screw.

Alan


acondit,
When you machined the ends of the ballscrews did you heat the ends to soften them? I tried to face the end of my ballscrew, so I could center drill it.....the facing sorta worked....looks like it polished the end.....and I wouldn't center drill the ballscrew......I was using a HSS center drill....looks like it just polished the center.

acondit
11-23-2005, 07:14 PM
I finally found some time to do some more work. I just finished the front x-axis bearing mount.

One bearing mounts from the front side and the other from the backside. The outer races fit against the bottoms of their respective pockets and the inner races are pulled towards each other (adjusted) by means of the shoulder on the screw and the adjusting nuts.

acondit
12-27-2005, 07:33 PM
This turned out to be a lot more complicated than the front bearing mount. All because it was for a single bearing rather than double bearings. Because there was no bearing hole on the front side, I couldn't mount it in my 3jaw chuck to turn down the inside face. So I bought a 3" 4jaw for a mini-lathe. Made an adapter to fit my 9x20 lathe and mounted the small 4jaw on it. This 3" 4jaw is just the right size for small parts like this.

Now I have to finish the nut for the X-axis screw and mount the screw.

acondit
12-30-2005, 05:50 PM
I finished installing the x-axis screw and now I have had all three axii moving under power (drill power).

Now I need to finish my power supply, controller box and motor mounts. I have attached a picture of how I am thinking about laying it out. I am still waiting for my "mini-io" board from CandCNC.

I have some SS2000MD4 bipolar controllers by Superior Electric. They are 4 amp 40 volt max but they only cost me about $25 a piece. I am going to be using some M092LS09 Superior steppers that I have. New old stock, another ebay find. They are about 200oz.in. unipolar. They are rated as 1.85 Volts and 4.6amps. I am planning to drive them with about 36 volts.

I am getting anxious. Now I just have to avoid making mistakes by rushing.

Alan

acondit
03-23-2006, 07:15 PM
Well, I got three Nema 34 Motor mount plates completed. And I have the first motor mounted to the Z-axis.

acondit
03-24-2006, 05:53 PM
Well, I got the motor mounting for the X-Axis finished and the motor mounted. Now I just have to figure out how I want to mount the Y-Axis motor. After that I have to finish the powersupply and wire everything up and then I should be able to start figuring out the software end of things.

Alan

Halfnutz
03-24-2006, 08:38 PM
Nice progress, looks heavy duty. How bout a pic of the whole thing?

acondit
03-24-2006, 10:27 PM
Halfnutz,

I'll do that shortly. First, I have to unstack everything off of it so that I can see it. :-)

Alan

acondit
04-01-2006, 06:21 PM
Well, I figured out how I wanted to do the Y-Axis motor mount. So here are some pictures with the motors mounted on the X, Y and Z axii (Latin right) and the Z-Axis mounted on the machine.

I still need to finish the power supply and controller setup. Then I will need some help on getting the software working.

Alan

Halfnutz
04-02-2006, 10:47 AM
Nice router acondit, I like it! It reminds me of my own, very similar to mine:

http://www.cnczone.com/forums/showthread.php?t=11087

I just put the new 425 oz/in motors and a new controller on it, it is so fast, 60ipm rapids, could go faster probably.

Nice job man, keep us posted!

acondit
11-16-2006, 02:40 PM
Well after several months of being busy with my job, I finally got back to my router.

I got all three motors wired up to the controllers and hooked it up to my computer that has EMC2 on it. I am able to jog at about 45" a minute for most of the axii. However, I have a slightly bent screw on the Y-axis. When I start to get close to one side it begins to cause problems. It will still run 30ipm there. The screw is out of straight by about 0.030". I don't know whether I can straighten it or not.

Alan

acondit
11-18-2006, 01:06 AM
I designed a circuit to be used for either an optical limit switch or a pulse generator to measure spindle speed (or synchronize a spindle for threading). I am using a Harris H22A1 for the opto interrupter switch (OIS). The circuit is designed such that the switch will function as either a normally open (NO) or a normally closed (NC) switch. There is also an LED that lights when there is power to the board and the detector circuit is not blocked. The circuit uses a 4 pin connector: pin 1 is +5volts, pin 2 is ground, pin 3 is normally closed and pin 4 is normally open.

To use the switch as a pulse generator a wheel with tab(s) is placed on the spindle and the OIS is placed near the spindle such that as the wheel rotates the tabs interrupt the passage of light from the OIS LED to the OIS photo transistor. Each time this happens, a pulse is produced. Since the transition can be either ON or OFF depending on which output is used it is very flexible.

To use the switch as a limit switch, it must be mounted on either the fixed or the moving component and a tab fixed to the opposite component such that as the machine nears the limit the tab will interrupt the passage of light from the OIS LED to the OIS photo transistor. I am planning to mount my switches such that one switch per axis is required and that it will function as the limit for both ends of the travel. For example, I plan to mount the X-axis switch on the side of the gantry and the interrupter tabs near each end of the X-axis.

The circuit boards are double sided and about 1.5 X 1".

Alan

ZipSnipe
11-18-2006, 06:39 PM
Looking good, my only concern is the size spindle motor(That heavy blue PacificScience motor). I would watch for deflection maybe use a laser pointer in the spindle to shoot you a reference point on the table before you mount the motor,. Then when you go to mount the motor check to see if it( reference point) moved. I cound,t tell from the pics if you got the z axis mounted to that top gantry flat beam. If not maybe fab a bracket for that spot. Otherwise keep up the good work.

acondit
11-19-2006, 11:19 PM
ZipSnipe,

Actually, that heavy blue PacificScience motor is now mounted on my 9x20 lathe as a variable speed mod to my lathe. My router spindle is a PorterCable router. The blue motor on the top of my Z is a Superior Electric Stepper. And after I get the limit switches installed I am going to have to do a lot of checking about deflection. All of the thompson bearings are ball bushings and I am thinking about replacing them with something like the frelon bushings if there is deflection attributable to the bearings.

Alan

acondit
01-01-2007, 11:59 PM
I used Igus B15 Energy Chain for the Y-axis wiring. The applications tech at Igus helped me figure out which size to buy and how much I needed. I would have bought way too much without his help. You only need enough to start at the middle and travel to each side Plus the curve. I would have probably bought enough to go from the front to the back plus the curve. I still need to fasten down the loose wires.

I also used Igus Energy Chain for the Z-axis wiring, both where the Z-axis travels on the Y-axis and the Z-axis itself. I found a good buy on a couple of pieces on eBay.

I probably need to use some spiral wrap to neaten up the motor wiring.

Here is the AC plug for the router spindle. I haven't decided whether to coil the router's cord around the router or shorten it up. I am leaning towards just coiling it up so that I don't have to have an extension cord anytime I want to use the router by itself.

Alan

Halfnutz
01-02-2007, 05:04 AM
Great going Alan, the cable carriers really add a professional touch, and they are nice 'cause they're the smaller size, perfect for a router. I am really interested in your optical switch, what a great multi tasking little DIY, I bet the boards or a kit would sell well, very cool. With a nice paint job youl have a machine that looks like you spent 3-4 grand. Any more details on that switch would be great! I'll check your website.

acondit
01-03-2007, 12:02 AM
Halfnutz,

Thanks for the compliment. I see now why people often build more than one router. I have learned a lot in building this one and have some things that I would (will?) definitely do different on another one.

I have gone through four iterations of circuit boards on the limit switch to get to one that I really like. I have about a half dozen of them and I want to do some testing before I even consider trying to sell them to someone else.

Alan

acondit
01-07-2007, 07:01 PM
I am thinking that I will save my optical switches for Home(s) and use mechanical switches for the limits. It will be easier to create a serial loop of NC switches with the mechanical ones.

I am thinking about mounting the two X-axis limits like the one I show in the picture. I will have to drill the tab on the gantry and put in a pan head machine screw as an adjustable stop.

What do you all think?

acondit
01-09-2007, 12:13 AM
As I was starting to install the limit switches, I discovered that the x-axis was going the opposite direction that I expected when I jogged and the z-axis was homing down instead of up.

I am running emc2. Both problems turned out to be easy fixes. I found a message in the emc forum where someone else had the same problem of the axis moving the opposite direction to that expected and the solution was an easy edit of the ini file. The homing of the z-axis was also an easy fix. I had set all three axii to home to 0 and I just had to change z to home to max-z.

moonlighttech
01-09-2007, 10:47 AM
Hi Alan -
I've visited your web page. Very nice, like the good work you've done with your CNC router. I love the limit switch! I designed one very similar to show the status of a vacuum valve. You do PCB's too? I also noted you might be on multiple forums? I gotta ask, how do you find the time!! Are you busy or what! Okay, I'm impressed! Maybe I should stop playing Hoyle card games (my clock indicates It can bend space and time) and focus!! I must have that tilt foundry!

I have always preferred non contact limits. I've even designed DC motor controllers that sense end of travel load currents. One of my favorites (that you don't need) is just a glass encapsulated reed switch with a rare earth magnet. You move whichever is the easiest. I use the micro style SPDT type so it can be normally open or closed, high or low. I imbed it in a 5 min epoxy block if it's mounted above the surface or I route a small slot and bury it flush to the surface. The magnet is .125 dia and .187 thick and it gets imbedded flush as well. It makes some people nervous when they can't see the limit and can't hear the click. I like it.

I tested repeatability on a single stage with 1/4-20 acme leadscrew and a dc motor control (not relay). As the switch position moved the stage stopped within 6 microns, about .00025 which is pretty good for a home position. If you implement a backup and creep manuver it might improve even more. I couldn't do that then. The reed snap may vary that much too, I don't know. A PM DC motor has cogging but it's alot coarser than a stepper which depends on it. The elimination of the DC motor and gearing to drive the leadscrew might result in better repeatability by stopping on a higher resolution cog of sorts.

I've been doing other things than CNC for the last few years. Things have changed. There used to be an outfit called Digital Design in Florida that had a program called Z-Trace which outlined gerber files into G-code. I think they're gone. Any suggestions? A better way?

Looking forward to your progress and comments!
-

acondit
01-09-2007, 01:41 PM
moonlighttech,

I am officially retired. I have a problem in that I am much better at starting new projects that getting them completed. I have enough projects started to probably keep me busy for a year without starting anything new. I am trying to turn over a new leaf and get several of my ongoing projects completed.

I have been designing (in my head) a case for my optical limit switch that would allow it to be activated by a plunger from either side (like the limit switch on the X-axis of some mills). I really like your idea for a magnetic limit switch. Magnetism works through dust. How is it affected when machining steel or cast iron?

I have my circuit boards done commercially.

moonlighttech
01-10-2007, 02:55 PM
Alan,
I'm sure any magnetic particle near the magnet would be attracted to it. My guess is that it would blurr or spread the field and change the switch point. The physical location is the determining factor. I would probably mount the reed switch for X somewhere least affected, say the leadscrew nut, and keep the magnet at the extreme ends. You could use 2 reeds wired to indicate both ends or just a state at each end of travel. The other stages are higher and affected to a lesser degree. Again it's the physical mounting. I don't have a complete answer. This is one of those challenges I'll face when I do my machine. I hate to say they won't work or the mounting difficulties pass the point of being realistically worth the effort just yet but it may be so!
This is also coupled to another design challenge of protecting the bearing rods or rails. I guess "up, up, and away!" actually refers to a rod or rail mounting location!! Just as "put it where the sun doesn't shine" is for mounting magnetic reed switches!! Sorry this is my best answer but I haven't done it yet. Who knows, the answer may be rubber boots, or a lip over a ledge, even additional magnetic attractors to filter a specific area. Is gravity your working friend?. I beleive there is a usable solution. You may already have one!
-

Mr.Chips
01-10-2007, 10:40 PM
Well, I figured out how I wanted to do the Y-Axis motor mount. So here are some pictures with the motors mounted on the X, Y and Z axii (Latin right) and the Z-Axis mounted on the machine.

I still need to finish the power supply and controller setup. Then I will need some help on getting the software working.

Alan

Say is that a Bill P design Cyclone Vacuum in the backfround of Post #33? It is a perfect parterner for the dust maker CNC. I will be building one soo also.

Hager

acondit
01-10-2007, 11:19 PM
Say is that a Bill P design Cyclone Vacuum in the backfround of Post #33? It is a perfect partner for the dust maker CNC. I will be building one soo also.

Hager

Pretty much. I bought the cnc cut cyclone parts from a gentleman in Colorado. I bought a 2hp ShopFox (Grizzly) dust collector and married the two together.

It really does a nice job. I use it more as a huge vacuum than a dust collector. I have a twenty foot hose on it and it reaches most places in my shop.

Now that my router is almost done, it may begin to see more use as a dust collector.

Alan

acondit
01-14-2007, 04:49 PM
I am trying to tune my emc2 config file. My x-axis will jog at up to 120 ipm but my y-axis and z-axis will only jog about 60 ipm.

I am not sure whether is is my configuration or whether I have a slight alignment problem. I am using the same motor on all three axii. I am not surprised that the z-axis might be a little slower but near the ends of travel on all three axis there is a slight problem. Close to each end I have to slow the speed down.

moonlighttech
01-16-2007, 06:59 AM
I can't help with actual emc2 config code but check out decelleration parameters, how far, how fast. Steppers can decelerate to a stop or homing speed very very fast, load, speed and all that considered. Have you tested or played around with this?

Do you get full current/torque to your motors? Bipolar steppers produce more torque because both phases are always on in full step mode. So you need 2 times 4 amps per stepper to stay within limits of your driver. You need 24 amps for three steppers plus whatever extra you want so your not running at 100% capacity. Correct me if I'm wrong, please. Try removing power from the other two drivers or unplug the other two steppers, then test again.

What did you do about the bent Y axis leadscrew? Just curious.

Here's an idea to activate your optical limit switch. Make a pie shaped flat plate just a few mils thinner than the optical slot. Drill a small 1/16" hole near the perimeter of the wedges curved end. Pivot and spring load the tip to restrict rotation to a single plane. Your moving stage pushes a point on the wedge side causing the hole on the curved end (via the pivot) to pass between the optical elements so it activates. Pushing at different points on the side accelerates how fast the wedge moves, from 1:1 to 1:N. Whatever you decide to do, I think you'll have best results by going from darkness to light and by keeping the optical slot / interrupter clearance as small as possible without touching or rubbing.
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Rance
01-16-2007, 07:44 AM
Alan,

In regard to post #48, could you give us some contact info. for the guy that sells the cyclone parts? It would be appreciated. Thanks.

acondit
01-16-2007, 11:38 AM
I can't help with actual emc2 config code but check out decelleration parameters, how far, how fast. Steppers can decelerate to a stop or homing speed very very fast, load, speed and all that considered. Have you tested or played around with this?

I have been playing with the acceleration. I have got the Y-axis jogging at up to about 90ipm and the z-axis up to about 60ipm.

Do you get full current/torque to your motors? Bipolar steppers produce more torque because both phases are always on in full step mode. So you need 2 times 4 amps per stepper to stay within limits of your driver. You need 24 amps for three steppers plus whatever extra you want so your not running at 100% capacity. Correct me if I'm wrong, please. Try removing power from the other two drivers or unplug the other two steppers, then test again.

My drivers are limited to 4 amp max. I am currently running half-step mode. My steppers are 8 wire motors and I have them wired in series. Does that effect what I need in terms of current?

What did you do about the bent Y axis leadscrew? Just curious.
My Y-axis screw is still bent slightly (about .030 over its length. It is definitely noticeable when jogging the Y-axis at higher speeds, at 30ipm it is hardly noticeable. I will have to fix it or replace it. I have another 3/4x5x6' precision acme rod but I also have a 5/8x5x6' Nook ballscrew and double ballnuts. I just have to make up my mind which I want to use. I was saving the ballscrew for my mill project.

Here's an idea to activate your optical limit switch. Make a pie shaped flat plate just a few mils thinner than the optical slot. Drill a small 1/16" hole near the perimeter of the wedges curved end. Pivot and spring load the tip to restrict rotation to a single plane. Your moving stage pushes a point on the wedge side causing the hole on the curved end (via the pivot) to pass between the optical elements so it activates. Pushing at different points on the side accelerates how fast the wedge moves, from 1:1 to 1:N. Whatever you decide to do, I think you'll have best results by going from darkness to light and by keeping the optical slot / interrupter clearance as small as possible without touching or rubbing.
-

I have worked out a solution in my mind that involves mounting the circuit inside a sealed case with spring loaded push buttons on opposing sides so that it can be used in an environment involving coolant use. I am thinking of using two plates with small holes drilled in each. Then when either plate is pushed by its button it would block the light.

acondit
01-16-2007, 11:55 AM
Alan,

In regard to post #48, could you give us some contact info. for the guy that sells the cyclone parts? It would be appreciated. Thanks.

Rance,

Clark Echols was who I bought mine from. He and Bill Pence had a falling out.
Clark is still selling his kits as far as I can tell. I googled his name and dust collectors and found this web site. I just e-mailed him to see if he is still selling them but if you are interested I suggest you contact him directly.

http://www.cleanshopair.com/
support@cleanshopair.com

Alan

moonlighttech
01-17-2007, 09:49 AM
8 lead steppers are my favorite except for all those wires! Wiring them in series is the most common way and keeps the bipolar current the same as just one unipolar phase. Each phase has a voltage rating and when in series it doubles. That's usually somewhat transparent because steppers are run with many times the phase voltage and the drivers chop it at a current saturation level which is at or close to the actual voltage rating of the combined phases. This may reduce top speed however as a result of increased inductance but I don't think that's a problem If all your motors are wired the same. There is the possibility that the series connections are out of phase with each other. Double check the two wire colors at the series juction to verify all motors are the same.

In half step mode (includes microstepping) the phase sequence changes by alternating between two phases on and one phase on. The total current requirements will have an average 33% drop. However I disagree that the power supply can be reduced by that amount. I use the peak current rating to allow the power supply to operate between 66% and 100% of capacity with the majority of the duty cycle in the lower range. In your case you need 24 amps peak and will use 15.84 amps average. What do you have? Does this answer your question?

acondit
01-17-2007, 10:07 AM
In half step mode (includes microstepping) the phase sequence changes by alternating between two phases on and one phase on. The total current requirements will have an average 33% drop. However I disagree that the power supply can be reduced by that amount. I use the peak current rating to allow the power supply to operate between 66% and 100% of capacity with the majority of the duty cycle in the lower range. In your case you need 24 amps peak and will use 15.84 amps average. What do you have? Does this answer your question?

I have about 16 amps. I think the problem is the bearing adjustment on the Y-axis. The z-axis may just be the weight. It runs about the same speed as when it was the only thing connected to the power supply.

Alan

moonlighttech
01-18-2007, 01:13 AM
You are probably right. Maybe it's an easy fix. Would that affect both ends? I would reserve the ballscrew for your mill where the results will yield even greater personal satisfaction for you. I know my Enco Drill/Mill is in desperate need of ballscrews before I retrofit it to CNC.

Aside from the Y axis glitch and completing the optical limits, you're just about finished aren't you?

What's next?
(besides the new projects planned for your completed CNC!)

About your power supply, I realized that the chopper stabilization is also reducing current. I think my earlier analysis overlooked that. Your power supply is fine.

Rance
01-18-2007, 11:24 AM
...Here's an idea to activate your optical limit switch. ...blah, blah, blah...

moonlighttech, Sorry but I'm having a little trouble following you on this. I'm sure it is me, not you though. A pic is worth a 1000 words. I'm very interested in 'seeing' what you are describing. Would you be interested in starting an 'Optical Limit/Home switch' thread to elaborate on this? I don't want to hijack Alan's thread.

Rance

acondit
01-18-2007, 02:45 PM
I finally got some help from a couple of emc2 gurus and got my limit switches working. Yea!!! It appears that some info hasn't been written in the integrator's manual yet and it was what I needed.

Now if I can just get my Estop working. It seems that the pullup on my CandCNC mini-IO board is not pulling up. So the software never detects that the Estop switch has changed state. Hopefully Tom at CandCNC will have some helpful ideas. I really like his board and I hope that it wasn't my fault. Oh well.

Alan

moonlighttech
01-19-2007, 10:02 AM
I'll answer on your optical mice thread.
While here, check Alan's optical switch pcb!

acondit
01-21-2007, 07:32 PM
Here is a picture of how I built my stops for my limit switches on the x-axis and the z-axis. This one is located on the z-axis. I mounted it with JB Weld epoxy.

Alan

acondit
01-29-2007, 02:29 PM
I re-did my limit switch loop. I was getting three error messages when I ran into a limit because as far as it was concerned I had hit all three limits at once. Now I only get a limit message for the appropriate axis.

I separated it into 3 loops, one for each axis. So each loop has two switches. On each axis I use one of the switches as both a limit and home and the other as just a limit. EMC2 supports this in software. It ignores the limit when homing. It can run into a switch, back off, slow down and run into it slowly to increase the accuracy, and the back off a measured distance and set the home position. Even those cheap Radio Shack switches seem fairly accurate and repeatable.

I have been dry running some gcode to try and eliminate any bugs in the machine before I actually try to cut something. On curves where the curve causes an axis to change direction I am getting horrible noises. I will have to figure that out. Any ideas?

Alan

Mr.Chips
01-29-2007, 02:48 PM
I re-did my limit switch loop. I was getting three error messages when I ran into a limit because as far as it was concerned I had hit all three limits at once. Now I only get a limit message for the appropriate axis.

I separated it into 3 loops, one for each axis. So each loop has two switches. On each axis I use one of the switches as both a limit and home and the other as just a limit. EMC2 supports this in software. It ignores the limit when homing. It can run into a switch, back off, slow down and run into it slowly to increase the accuracy, and the back off a measured distance and set the home position. Even those cheap Radio Shack switches seem fairly accurate and repeatable.

I have been dry running some gcode to try and eliminate any bugs in the machine before I actually try to cut something. On curves where the curve causes an axis to change direction I am getting horrible noises. I will have to figure that out. Any ideas?

Alan


Thanks Alan,

Is this what you are saying? I like pictures, avoid a lot of confusion, especially on my part.
Hager

acondit
01-29-2007, 06:05 PM
Thanks Alan,

Is this what you are saying? I like pictures, avoid a lot of confusion, especially on my part.
Hager

Hager,

My jumper block (your JP3) is a little different, but that is the circuit.

I like your jpg. What did you use to draw it? I would like to draw up mine with the connections to the CandCNC mini-IO breakout board.

Alan

Mr.Chips
01-29-2007, 06:53 PM
Hager,

My jumper block (your JP3) is a little different, but that is the circuit.

I like your jpg. What did you use to draw it? I would like to draw up mine with the connections to the CandCNC mini-IO breakout board.

Alan

He He I used MS Paint. It is OK but not teriffic. I used to have a circuit drg software called Viseo It was super. You could move things around and the the lines stay connected. I really miss it.

Hager

acondit
01-29-2007, 08:24 PM
I found out that the thrust bearing adjusting nuts were loose on both the x and the y axis. I knew that the x-axis needed adjusting, but the nuts on the y-axis are down in a pocket and I couldn't even see them until I took the motor off. I discovered that both nuts were completely loose. It was only the close fit between the bearings at both ends of the screws that made it useable at all.

I adjusted everything again and now it is a whole lot quieter. Yea!

Alan

moonlighttech
01-30-2007, 05:31 AM
I separated it into 3 loops, one for each axis. So each loop has two switches. On each axis I use one of the switches as both a limit and home and the other as just a limit.


Do you mean they are really limits all the time but homing adds an additional back up and slow approach until a limit is hit? Do you have seperate inputs for limit and home? It looks like the circuit doesn't cares if one ot two switches are used. Are you using two as a fail-safe in case one fails? The dual use of the limit switches as both a home and limit sometimes confuses me. Are the switches mounted differently for homing and limit? I prefer seperate inputs but I guess it doesn't matter, both methods work fine.

Ignore me, it's late at night, run some code and tell us how it goes!! Any more pictures recently?

Mr.Chips
01-30-2007, 10:59 AM
Do you mean they are really limits all the time but homing adds an additional back up and slow approach until a limit is hit? Do you have seperate inputs for limit and home? It looks like the circuit doesn't cares if one ot two switches are used. Are you using two as a fail-safe in case one fails? The dual use of the limit switches as both a home and limit sometimes confuses me. Are the switches mounted differently for homing and limit? I prefer seperate inputs but I guess it doesn't matter, both methods work fine.

Ignore me, it's late at night, run some code and tell us how it goes!! Any more pictures recently?

Yes I thought I would need a total of six switches also. But I found out that Mach 3 is a LOT smarter than I am, and only need 3 SW.

As you can see in the drawing the Home/Limit SW on the right is wired in series with the Limit SW on the left. Within Mach 3 you define the direction that the axis will be moving to hit the Home/limit SW and this way it knows which way it is moving and knows which SW is which. And all the returns are tied together so it's a three wire system.

Like I said, smarter than me. Anyway this is what I am told.

Hager

acondit
01-30-2007, 11:00 AM
Do you mean they are really limits all the time but homing adds an additional back up and slow approach until a limit is hit? Do you have seperate inputs for limit and home? It looks like the circuit doesn't cares if one ot two switches are used. Are you using two as a fail-safe in case one fails? The dual use of the limit switches as both a home and limit sometimes confuses me. Are the switches mounted differently for homing and limit? I prefer seperate inputs but I guess it doesn't matter, both methods work fine.

Ignore me, it's late at night, run some code and tell us how it goes!! Any more pictures recently?

Moonlighttech,

There is only one switch at each end of the axis (no fail safe other than the limited power of the steppers). I don't have to change anything in order to home. The software (emc2) just ignores the limit during homing and treats the switch as a home switch. So, yes, if you have it programmed correctly, it runs into the home/limit, backs up a specified distance, changes velocity and direction and seeks home again at reduced speed, finds home and backs off a specified distance and sets that to the value specified as the home position. From that point on (until you home again) it treats the switch as a limit switch.

I have epoxied (JB Weld) the stops for the z-axis to the bearing blocks. Before I got everything adjusted, I hit one of the stops, stepped the wrong direction and popped the stop off of the block and bent the lever on the switch. Now I have them adjusted so that they trigger before hitting the end of travel but will run into end of travel before damaging the switches or stops.

Alan

Mr.Chips
01-30-2007, 11:21 AM
Moonlighttech,

There is only one switch at each end of the axis (no fail safe other than the limited power of the steppers). I don't have to change anything in order to home. The software (emc2) just ignores the limit during homing and treats the switch as a home switch. So, yes, if you have it programmed correctly, it runs into the home/limit, backs up a specified distance, changes velocity and direction and seeks home again at reduced speed, finds home and backs off a specified distance and sets that to the value specified as the home position. From that point on (until you home again) it treats the switch as a limit switch.

I have epoxied (JB Weld) the stops for the z-axis to the bearing blocks. Before I got everything adjusted, I hit one of the stops, stepped the wrong direction and popped the stop off of the block and bent the lever on the switch. Now I have them adjusted so that they trigger before hitting the end of travel but will run into end of travel before damaging the switches or stops.

Alan

I was worried about possible SW damage also, and as you describe if it hits it head on like in the lower view it could be crushed.

I used a cam actuator and adjusted the SW so they didn’t bottom out and be damaged by the actuator.

After I got the SW's mounted I started thinking about dust and how it would effect the SW's but that's a different story.

Hager

acondit
01-30-2007, 02:38 PM
I was worried about possible SW damage also, and as you describe if it hits it head on like in the lower view it could be crushed.

I used a cam actuator and adjusted the SW so they didn’t bottom out and be damaged by the actuator.

After I got the SW's mounted I started thinking about dust and how it would effect the SW's but that's a different story.

Hager

Hager,

I have run each axis into the limit switches at maximum velocity that I have the router set for (120 ipm) and they all stop before hitting the end of travel and even at the end of travel there is slightly more travel left in the limit switch.

If I hit end of travel at maximum speed, I have to turn power off and turn the screw slightly by hand to free it up (it binds slightly). However, it doesn't seem to be traveling fast enough to damage anything.

I haven't actually cut anything yet so I don't have an answer on the dust problem. I look forward to having to explore that problem shortly.

Alan

Mr.Chips
01-30-2007, 07:07 PM
Hager,

1. I have run each axis into the limit switches at maximum velocity that I have the router set for (120 ipm) and they all stop before hitting the end of travel and even at the end of travel there is slightly more travel left in the limit switch.

2. If I hit end of travel at maximum speed, I have to turn power off and turn the screw slightly by hand to free it up (it binds slightly). However, it doesn't seem to be traveling fast enough to damage anything.

3. I haven't actually cut anything yet so I don't have an answer on the dust problem. I look forward to having to explore that problem shortly.

Alan

Alan,

1. That's good to know, I was worried about the stopping power, damaging the SW that's why I went with the Cam actuator design. I haven't even run mine yet, am erring on the side of safety.

2. “If I hit end of travel at maximum speed” Do you mean you are going full speed and it stops when the limit SW is actuated?
What is it binding on?
Why would you have to back it up by hand?

3. I haven’t cut anything yet either. And I’m getting anxious too. Just dotting all the I’s and crossing the T’s right now.

Hager

acondit
01-30-2007, 09:12 PM
Hager,

I interspersed my answer with your question.

2. “If I hit end of travel at maximum speed” Do you mean you are going full speed and it stops when the limit SW is actuated? NO, before limit switches were installed, hitting the end of the machine. With the limit switches installed it doesn't hit the end of the machine.
What was it binding on? The end of the machine.
Why would you have to back it up by hand? To unbind the screw.


Alan

Mr.Chips
01-30-2007, 09:31 PM
Hager,

I interspersed my answer with your question.

2. “If I hit end of travel at maximum speed” Do you mean you are going full speed and it stops when the limit SW is actuated? NO, before limit switches were installed, hitting the end of the machine. With the limit switches installed it doesn't hit the end of the machine.
What was it binding on? The end of the machine.
Why would you have to back it up by hand? To unbind the screw.


Alan

I get now, #2 was before limit switches.
Thanks Alan

Hager

moonlighttech
02-02-2007, 08:43 PM
Thanks for the answers guys. I asked wondering if the optical switches were somehow not going to work. They'll work beautifully! You're right about the limited torque too. I think I'll include a deceleration coil spring to offer increasing stopping power up to the steppers stall torque as a fail safe on my machine. You're planning a spring loaded plunger actuator for your optical limit switches, is this idea worth integrating into it?
-

frankg521
02-02-2007, 08:57 PM
Hey acondit nice router ....I really like the z axis design... do you have a parts list, and do you buy your aluminum on line

Frank

acondit
02-02-2007, 10:01 PM
Thanks for the answers guys. I asked wondering if the optical switches were somehow not going to work. They'll work beautifully! You're right about the limited torque too. I think I'll include a deceleration coil spring to offer increasing stopping power up to the steppers stall torque as a fail safe on my machine. You're planning a spring loaded plunger actuator for your optical limit switches, is this idea worth integrating into it?
-

Moonlighttech,

The spring that I am planning in the optical switch is just to return the actuator to the open position. I don't think that the deceleration spring is necessary but if I break something I reserve the right to change my mind.

Alan

acondit
02-02-2007, 10:11 PM
Hey acondit nice router ....I really like the z axis design... do you have a parts list, and do you buy your aluminum on line

Frank

Frank,

I have just purchased aluminum from a local metal recycler. I was lucky enough to find what I needed.

I have a parts list but I am not willing to share it until I am satisfied that my design is solid. I have some play in the Z that I am not happy with at the moment. I don't know whether the z-axis is flexing or whether the flex is in the mounting of the y-axis to the mdf.

I bought all of the components that I used (except for leadscrews and the ball bearings that I used for the leadscrews) on ebay.

Alan

moonlighttech
02-03-2007, 07:01 PM
Engineers without a problem to solve,
will invent their own problems.
:o Sorry, I lost focus. No more side trips.

acondit
03-14-2007, 05:24 PM
I discovered that I had almost a 1/16" flex in the gantry at the sides when I pushed on them. So I am redesigning the gantry. I am taking the idea from Joe's 2006 design. I am building a lower torsion box instead of just a drive plate and an upper torsion box as well.

Since I am having to do a bunch of rework, I am also flipping the mounting for the X rails as well. They will now be mounted on the top plate rather than the bottom plate. This should insure that they are in a plane with the top of the cutting surface (only off by the variance in the thickness of the MDF). Since the top surface is supported by the torsion box they will also be supported by the torsion box.

Alan

acondit
03-15-2007, 10:53 PM
Well, I made my first cuts with my CNC router. I used it to cut slots in a sacrificial top to mount aluminum T-Slots. I bought (5) 36" T-Slots from Grizzly.

I wrote the gcode by hand to cut the slots. The hardest part of writing the code was figuring out the initialization code. Once I got that all of the rest of it worked great. I used a 5/8" standard router bit to cut the 3/4" slots. I made one pass down, stepped over 1/8" and made a pass back for each slot, and then step back to the starting point. I made the slots 5/8" longer than the tracks to allow for the 5/16" radius corners at the ends of the slots. The tracks were right on the money for width. I plunged at 20 ipm and cut at 45 ipm. I think I could have cut faster but it worked. Yea!!!

Even with my dust collector there was dust everywhere. I am definitely going to have to make a dust collection shoe for the router.

Now I have to get to work on stiffening the Gantry. With the T-Slots in place I should be able to cut out the parts with my router.

Alan

moonlighttech
03-19-2007, 04:47 AM
Glad to see you back at your router Alan. Congrats on the G-code! I'm still very interested in your progress and "speedbumps", like the gantry. Just watching the ride.

acondit
04-06-2007, 11:53 AM
moonlighttech,

I have been out of town for two weeks so that slowed things down. I just got back to it again. I have straightened most of the bend in my Y-Axis lead screw that Made a real difference in how it moves. Much less vibration at higher speeds.

Alan

acondit
04-06-2007, 07:38 PM
I drew my house number in VectorWorks as outlined text. Then I offset lines inside 1/8" repeating until the lines ran into each other. Then I moved each set of inset lines to a separate layer. Then I used NCPlot2 to generate the gcode. I stepped down 1/8" for each successive layer. It probably should have been smaller steps, but not bad for a first try.

I made one boo-boo when I had the feed set too fast and lost some steps. You can see the little tail up at the top of the "0". I ran the start of the code several times. I ran it a couple of times with the router set too high to cut, so that I could get the board positioned on the router. Then my config file for EMC2 gave me problems on a couple of runs. After I made fixes in my config file I would home the machine, reload the file and start again. It would cut precisely in the previous cuts until it came to the point where it had errored out and just continue cutting with not obvious sign that it was not a continuous cut.

Yea!!! I love it.

Alan

acondit
04-20-2007, 07:12 PM
I have been working on the drawings for the torsion boxes for my Y-axis, but I wanted to cut something smaller before trying to cut the ribs. So I started on the dust collector hook-up.

The holes were within .002 diameter specified in my drawings. I cut the holes with a solid carbide 0.125" up spiral bit. I cut 0.25" depth per pass at 50 ipm. I lowered the speed to 40 ipm for the outside just to see how the two compared. It was real smooth at both speeds and the router didn't seem to have any problem with either speed. I am using a Porter Cable 690 router (1.5hp).

I made one boo boo when starting out, so I will have to re-cut the piece but this time I will use 1/2" mdf. In the first picture you can see where I didn't have my XY offsets correct at first and I didn't have enough of the bit out, so when it started to cut the 1/2" hole, it tried to drive the bit holder down into the mdf. It just burned the mdf a little before I hit the E-stop. Exciting!!!

Alan

acondit
04-23-2007, 12:43 AM
Well, I read some of the other posts that suggested using double sided carpet tape as a hold down. I tried it and it worked for me. I was real frustrated with the T-slot track and clamps. It seemed that they were always in the way.

I have been learning a lot about gcode but still have a lot to learn. I have written couple of macros to shorten up my code and make it more reuseable. I wrote one subroutine to cut holes. You pass it the center XY coordinates, and the diameter and it cuts the hole in the correct location. Currently it uses a variable that I set in each program for the diameter of the tool bit that is being used. So if I want to run the program with a different bit, I just have to change the diameter variable in the program. Now if I could just get tool path compensation to work.

Here are some pictures of the dust collector attachment. I still need to add a skirt to it.

Alan

joecnc2006
04-23-2007, 04:23 PM
Well, I read some of the other posts that suggested using double sided carpet tape as a hold down. I tried it and it worked for me. I was real frustrated with the T-slot track and clamps. It seemed that they were always in the way.

I have been learning a lot about gcode but still have a lot to learn. I have written couple of macros to shorten up my code and make it more reuseable. I wrote one subroutine to cut holes. You pass it the center XY coordinates, and the diameter and it cuts the hole in the correct location. Currently it uses a variable that I set in each program for the diameter of the tool bit that is being used. So if I want to run the program with a different bit, I just have to change the diameter variable in the program. Now if I could just get tool path compensation to work.

Here are some pictures of the dust collector attachment. I still need to add a skirt to it.

Alan

Dust collection looks good, very similar to the one i did to help extend for the ATC.

Joe

crocky
04-23-2007, 06:26 PM
Well, I read some of the other posts that suggested using double sided carpet tape as a hold down. I tried it and it worked for me. I was real frustrated with the T-slot track and clamps. It seemed that they were always in the way.

I have been learning a lot about gcode but still have a lot to learn. I have written couple of macros to shorten up my code and make it more reuseable. I wrote one subroutine to cut holes. You pass it the center XY coordinates, and the diameter and it cuts the hole in the correct location. Currently it uses a variable that I set in each program for the diameter of the tool bit that is being used. So if I want to run the program with a different bit, I just have to change the diameter variable in the program. Now if I could just get tool path compensation to work.

Here are some pictures of the dust collector attachment. I still need to add a skirt to it.

Alan

Hi Alan,

Looks very good to me, I will have to make one for mine when I get it finished. Thanks for the pics :)

Bob

acondit
04-23-2007, 10:44 PM
Dust collection looks good, very similar to the one i did to help extend for the ATC.

Joe

Joe,

It should look a lot like yours, I started out from your design. I used your dxf as a starting point and just modified it to work with my Z-axis.

I just received the ATC components from HiTechSystems today, also.

Thanks,
Alan

acondit
04-23-2007, 10:48 PM
Hi Alan,

Looks very good to me, I will have to make one for mine when I get it finished. Thanks for the pics :)

Bob

Bob,

Since I started out from Joe's design, if I can give you any help just holler. It seems only fair to keep passing on what we have learned from the efforts of others.

Alan

acondit
04-26-2007, 07:04 PM
I got the skirt made for the dust collector attachment. It works great, no more dust flying around.

I cut out the two long ribs for the torsion box that will go at the bottom of the gantry. I wrote the gcode by hand and messed up two things on the first rib. I only cut five slots for the cross ribs instead of six and I had a measurement of 33.9 instead of 33.99 for the end tab. I fixed those and cut out two more ribs. They are a snug fit and line up both directions.

Alan

joecnc2006
04-26-2007, 07:22 PM
Looks good, Yea when i did the dust collector it does not leave any mdf on the stock now, only a little in the cuts only, it works real good.

Joe

acondit
04-27-2007, 10:49 PM
Well, I cut out the cross ribs for the Gantry Bottom Torsion Box. I laid them out so that they were just the width of the bit apart and cut away (third picture). The bit would track right in the previous cut at those common cuts. The fit is a nice snug push together with your thumbs fit. My bottom torsion box is 11.5 inches wide by 34.5 inches long by 2 inches thick.

Next is to cut the top Y-axis Torsion box ribs.

Alan

acondit
05-06-2007, 12:53 AM
I got tired of holding the hose for the dust collector so I put in some semi-permanent tubing fastened to the ceiling with a shorter section of flex hose connecting the router. It makes life a lot easier.

I have cut out both of the horizontal ribs for the Y-axis torsion box and 5 of the 7 vertical ribs. So I just need to cut out two more vertical ribs and then the 1/4" skins for both sides of the bottom torsion box and both sides of the Y-Axis torsion box.

I love watching this thing cut. You can run it a second time and it will just follow the prior cut. It is just so amazing.

Alan

acondit
05-07-2007, 11:29 AM
Well, I finished the ribs for the Y-axis torsion box. Now I need to cut the plates for the two gantry torsion boxes. Then I have to cut my new gantry sides and either figure out how to mount my z-axis or build a new 'Z' like Joe's.

Here is a picture of my dust collector hookup. It works sweet. I am also going to redesign the connection to the router. I don't like the reducer, so, I am going to redesign the pickup with a 4" opening for the hose connector.

Maybe I ought to cut out all the parts to build a Joe's 2006 R-2 and try and sell my existing router?

Alan

crocky
05-07-2007, 07:41 PM
Well, I finished the ribs for the Y-axis torsion box. Now I need to cut the plates for the two gantry torsion boxes. Then I have to cut my new gantry sides and either figure out how to mount my z-axis or build a new 'Z' like Joe's.

Here is a picture of my dust collector hookup. It works sweet. I am also going to redesign the connection to the router. I don't like the reducer, so, I am going to redesign the pickup with a 4" opening for the hose connector.

Maybe I ought to cut out all the parts to build a Joe's 2006 R-2 and try and sell my existing router?

Alan

Just love to watch the work being carried out here, the Joe's 2006 R2 is probably a pretty good idea :) seems like you are going that way anyway :)

Dust collector looks pretty good and 4" opening at the router end will improve it a little bit, excellent work and the pics make it easy to see what you are up too.

Bob

acondit
05-22-2007, 02:50 PM
Well, I finished the 4" pickup for my dust collector to Router connection. I haven't tried it out yet but I am hopeful that it will leave a little less material in the grooves.

My camera battery was running out on the last picture so it didn't flash. You can see through the plastic from the sunlight coming through the window.

Alan

acondit
06-30-2007, 07:54 PM
I started to cut out two new gantry sides. I used the double sided tape to hold down the first one. The first holes were ok, but when the router moved to the far end of the piece the leverage started to cause it to shift positions. I quickly killed the run and managed to save the piece. So what should I do now?

Well, I decided that I would drill the sacrificial top for three 1/4" dowels. I drilled the dowel holes and repositioned the piece with the bottom two dowels and drilled the top dowel hole and added that dowel. Then I commented those holes out of the gcode and ran the rest of the gcode. It worked great.

For the second side, I positioned it, clamped it and cnc drilled the three dowel holes. Put in the three dowels and ran the gcode with those holes commented out. It worked great. Now if I need to do something more to the gantry piece I can reposition it very precisely.

Alan

acondit
07-13-2007, 01:58 PM
I don't yet have a cnc mill, but I do have a cnc router. So, I decided to see if it would be feasible to cut temporary parts from MDF to get the mill running CNC and use the mill with temporary MDF parts to cut final parts from aluminum. What do you guys think?

Here is the bearing support that I cut from MDF. Will it be strong enough to allow the mill to run cnc to cut a few parts parts from aluminum?

Alan

joecnc2006
07-13-2007, 03:07 PM
I don't yet have a cnc mill, but I do have a cnc router. So, I decided to see if it would be feasible to cut temporary parts from MDF to get the mill running CNC and use the mill with temporary MDF parts to cut final parts from aluminum. What do you guys think?

Here is the bearing support that I cut from MDF. Will it be strong enough to allow the mill to run cnc to cut a few parts parts from aluminum?

Alan

Definitely.



Joe

acondit
07-13-2007, 04:05 PM
Joe,

Thanks for the vote of confidence. I will give it a try when I get back home next week.

Alan

acondit
10-06-2007, 12:37 PM
Well, I still haven't decided whether to fix this router the way I want it or to just sell it and build another. It works well enough that I hate to tear it apart and I don't intend to reuse some of the more expensive parts, so I am leaning towards selling it. But in the meantime, I am using it to build the parts that I will either use to build another router, or to retrofit this one.

To that end, I got my vacuum bag clamping system working. I have attached a picture of one of the glued up gantry ends in the vacuum bag.

Alan

acondit
12-20-2007, 07:09 PM
I have been busy working on my cnc lathe conversion, but I decided to take a little break and see how my new gantry is coming along. My gantry is 11.5" at the base rather than Joe's original 9.5" and I am using 1" Thompson linear rails.

Alan

joecnc2006
12-20-2007, 07:57 PM
Looks good, interesting mods.

biotech1
12-20-2007, 09:59 PM
I have been busy working on my cnc lathe conversion,---ON that CNC Lathe conversion you. Do you have a thread on that, that is on my next list to do got to have one of the those... btw good work:banana:

jhowelb
12-20-2007, 10:01 PM
Alan,
Nice design, great build. As usual you do fantastic work!
jb

acondit
12-21-2007, 12:25 AM
I have been busy working on my cnc lathe conversion,---ON that CNC Lathe conversion you. Do you have a thread on that, that is on my next list to do got to have one of the those... btw good work:banana:

My cnclathe thread is here (http://www.cnczone.com/forums/showthread.php?t=37656). You can also read some about it on my website (http://www.alansmachineworks.com).

Thanks,
Alan

acondit
12-21-2007, 12:26 AM
Looks good, interesting mods.

Thanks Joe,
Alan

acondit
12-21-2007, 12:27 AM
Alan,
Nice design, great build. As usual you do fantastic work!
jb

Thanks John, but how am I ever going to catch up with you on our lathes.

Alan

jhowelb
12-21-2007, 12:36 AM
Thanks John, but how am I ever going to catch up with you on our lathes.

Alan

It appears that in some respects, I can't hold a candle for you to work by! LOL!
If God grants me health enough I hope to start a router soon. I know I won't be able to do the quality work you do but maybe I can compensate with selection of materials that lend themselves easily to one of these machines.

Anyway, just wanted to say good job and have a Merry Christmas!

jb

acondit
01-30-2008, 01:12 PM
Well I finally put a sacrificial board on top and surfaced it to create a level surface on which to cut parts. Imagine my dismay when i discovered that the cuts along the X-axis were smooth but there was a slight unevenness to the cuts across the on the Y-axis. I got out my square and discovered that the z-axis is out of square with the xy plane by about a 3/32" in 13.5 inches or just under 0.007 per inch. This results in about a 0.005" dip across the cut made by a 3/4" router bit.

I think that I am going to make new gantry sides on the router (I cut the old ones on the table saw). I don't want to try selling this router until I know that it is working correctly (and I have the parts all cut out for the next one).

Alan

acondit
01-31-2008, 05:11 PM
I did a little more careful checking today. I used a digital caliper to actually measure the amount by which the two y-axis rails were out of vertical. It appear that they are out of vertical by 0.016" and they are separated by a distance of 5.5", so it is actually a little less than 0.003"/inch.

It would appear that I could temporarily solve the problem by shimming out the lower rail by 0.016". Then I could check my results again. That would allow me to have it running better to cut out the new sides.

Alan

acondit
02-01-2008, 04:30 PM
I shimmed out the lower rail with some 0.016" x 1" brass stock. When I check the vertical now it is out 0.009" in 10.5" or a little less than 0.001"/inch. That should be good enough to cut the new gantry sides.

I ran my table surfacing code again and you can't see or feel any dips from the cutter so that is pretty good.

Alan

acondit
03-15-2008, 11:58 AM
I cut out pieces to cut long ribs for the x-axis a while back. Since they are too long to cut in one position I have been thinking about the proper way to cut them on the router in two passes.

I created a fence along the edge of my x-axis cut area, to align parts consistently with the x-axis. Then I (using double sided tape) used 3/4 inch spacers to move the part out from the fence so that I could cut both sides of the part. Since each rib has 7 rounded rectangular cutouts, I set up the gcode to cut 4 of them in the first pass and the second pass will cut the remaining 3 after flipping the piece end for end.

Then I took a piece of 3/4" mdf and cut out a piece that matched the size of the cutout but left 1/4" lip to act as a hold-down. I put it in the 4th hole and screwed it in place to act as a place holder to insure accurate positioning when the piece is flipped end for end. It is a snug fit so there should be no movement. I will still use double sided tape for the front end of the piece.

Alan

acondit
03-15-2008, 06:16 PM
Well with my first idea it was too difficult to get everything fastened down and in alignment.

So, I cut the lip off of the hole-spacer/hold-down, and sanded the top 1/4" to about a 3° taper and screwed it in place. Then I could put tape on the end of the piece, slip it over the spacer, push it down to set the tape and it was ready to go. It worked great and I got all four of the ribs cut out.

Alan

BobF
03-16-2008, 09:16 PM
Are you cutting ribs for Joes 2006 table? or they just look a lot like them?

:)

acondit
03-17-2008, 12:07 AM
Are you cutting ribs for Joes 2006 table? or they just look a lot like them?

:)

Bob,

They are almost identical but not quite. I re-drew them to make changing lengths a little easier and to make the tolerances a little tighter. But, they are definitely based on Joe's design.

Alan

BobF
03-18-2008, 09:59 PM
Bob,

They are almost identical but not quite. I re-drew them to make changing lengths a little easier and to make the tolerances a little tighter. But, they are definitely based on Joe's design.

Alan

Alan,
After spending several months building one, they are definitely recognizable.
Joes is a great design and well worth copying any of his ideas.
Hope it works well for you.

Bob

acondit
05-06-2008, 01:23 PM
For sometime now, I have had my top speed set at 90 ipm on both my X and Y. I have had my steppers wired bipolar series (I thought I had read that bipolar series would give you better top speed (I was wrong)). I have some old Superior Electric Nema 34 round steppers and I thought maybe they were the limiting factor. That I would need some newer steppers to get more speed.

I just read on the Zone that bipolar parallel will give you better speed. So, today I decided to experiment. I changed my X and Y steppers to bipolar parallel. My X axis will now run 210 ipm and my Y will run 180 ipm. Wow! What a difference. It is faster and smoother. I might even be able to get them both to run a little faster if I played with the acceleration a little more.

My Z-axis is using a six wire stepper so I can't run it bipolar parallel. I could try it half winding though??? What do you guys think?

Alan

acondit
05-16-2008, 04:37 PM
I am building a new dust collector shoe. It is almost an inch thinner than the one that I am now using but actually has a slightly larger internal airflow.

It is made of multiple layers glued up to form the shoe. It has a smaller hole in the top for the router bit (rather then fitting around the router body). Hopefully this will act as a deflector for the air being blown down by the router motor.

The top and bottom plates are cut from 1/4" mdf and the two middle layers are cut from 1/2" mdf. There is also a ring for the very top to provide additional support for the dust collector hose. It is cut from 3/4" mdf.

It should also be useable with either my Porter Cable router or my Hitachi.

Alan

acondit
05-20-2008, 02:27 PM
I decided that before I build a totally new machine, I wanted to improve this one a little bit. I drew up a new x-axis torsion box (that drew ideas from Joe's 2006 design) but will use my existing x-axis Thompson linear rails. The gantry sides are 34.5" apart and the x-axis torsion box will be 34" wide. So the top of the rails will be protected from falling dust. The rails will hang from the torsion box extensions. In the first picture the box is right side up but the rest of the pictures show the box upside down. The 1/4" mdf torsion box skin is only 26" wide. There will be a 3/4" x 34" x 49" piece of MDF as the top layer.

I plan to have everything cut out and ready to assemble before I disassemble the existing router to reuse the existing hardware (rails, bearings, screws, etc.).

Alan

crocky
05-27-2008, 07:34 PM
Hi Alan,

Looking good now, certainly enough clamps on it :)

Cheers,
Bob

acondit
05-27-2008, 10:20 PM
Hi Alan,

Looking good now, certainly enough clamps on it :)

Cheers,
Bob

Thanks Bob,

Yeah, I wanted to keep it square while it dried.

Alan

acondit
06-04-2008, 07:17 PM
I started priming the inside of the torsion box getting ready to glue the bottom plate on. I have realized that because of the way that I did the side supports for the Thompson linear rails, I won't be able to access the inside of the torsion box from the sides. So painting the inside becomes a bit of a "who's on first" problem. I can't finish painting the inside until the bottom plate is glued on and once it is glued on I can only paint inside by reaching in from the end holes. This means that I can't assemble the end pieces until after I paint the inside. It is probably not a big deal but it does make you stop and scratch your head.

So, I masked the spots on the bottom plate that need to be glued to the ribs. After priming it, I will rip off the tape and glue it to the ribs. When everything is dry, I will try to paint the insides.

Alan

CarveOne
06-05-2008, 06:32 AM
acondit,

I assume that the holes in the ribs are there to reduce weight but I don't know if they serve any other useful purpose. If the outer panels were made a little differently I think there would be no need to paint the insides of the torsion box for all but the most humid locales. I'm thinking that the through holes in the outer panels could have been 1/2" deep pockets on the inside, leaving a 1/4" thick solid outer surface. This doesn't reduce weight quite as much, but sealing and painting just the outer surfaces would possibly keep moisture out well enough. Most of the other round holes will have something going through them won't they?

Would this be something worth considering by other first time Joe's 2006 builders? Are there too many other necessary open holes to make this work. Just curious.

CarveOne

acondit
06-05-2008, 11:27 AM
CarveOne,

Thanks for the questions.


acondit,

I assume that the holes in the ribs are there to reduce weight but I don't know if they serve any other useful purpose. If the outer panels were made a little differently I think there would be no need to paint the insides of the torsion box for all but the most humid locales. I'm thinking that the through holes in the outer panels could have been 1/2" deep pockets on the inside, leaving a 1/4" thick solid outer surface.

Like the Y-axis horizontal ribs. However, since the ribs are only 1/2" mdf it would only be a 1/4" pocket.


This doesn't reduce weight quite as much, but sealing and painting just the outer surfaces would possibly keep moisture out well enough. Most of the other round holes will have something going through them won't they?Yes, but I actually used the side holes for clamps in gluing on the top plate. I don't have enough long clamps to have done the job without the side holes. Maybe I could have figured out some work around though. Gluing on the first plate is more involved than the second plate due to needing to keep everything square. When I glue on the second surface, it is not going to move out of square so I may not need as many clamps.


Would this be something worth considering by other first time Joe's 2006 builders? Are there too many other necessary open holes to make this work. Just curious.

CarveOneMoisture in the air doesn't need much of a hole to get through, I think there are too many holes (even with painting) to protect mdf in certain climates.

My first torsion box (not patterned after Joe's 2006) was not painted at all and I have had no problems with it. It has 1/2" baltic birch ribs, 1/4" MDF surfaces and is only 2 1/2" thick.

If I had waited until after I painted the inside to glue on the Thompson rail supports, life would have been easier.

Alan

CarveOne
06-05-2008, 08:43 PM
I just assumed that the mdf was 3/4" since that's all I have seen locally.

Ok, you certainly know more about what you are doing with your build than I do so proceed on with the show and I'll be watching.

Thanks,

CarveOne

acondit
06-06-2008, 10:52 AM
I just assumed that the mdf was 3/4" since that's all I have seen locally.

Ok, you certainly know more about what you are doing with your build than I do so proceed on with the show and I'll be watching.

Thanks,

CarveOne

Actually, if I really knew what I was doing I wouldn't have glued on the side supports until after painting the inside, but thanks for the assumption. I think that in the DIY world we mostly live in a "live and learn" world. I learn a lot from others experiences and so I like to share my good and bad decisions, in hope of helping others.

Alan

CarveOne
06-06-2008, 01:36 PM
I know what you mean. In my case, "reverse engineering" means doing everything backwards first. :)

CarveOne

acondit
10-17-2008, 11:44 AM
It has been several months since I really did anything on my router rebuild. I have been working on my CNC Lathe and using the router.

I didn't really like the idea of just using bolts and nuts for the bearing supports for my Y-axis, so, I spent some time thinking about what kind of solution that I would like. I designed a bearing standoff that would allow more precision assembly of the bearing brackets. I just finished yesterday turning 8 of them on my cnc lathe.

They have a 0.375 boss to fit into the holes on the angle brackets and a 10mm boss to fit a 6200 bearing. They are drilled and tapped thru for a 1/4x20 bolt. The 0.375 boss is only 0.120" long so that the screw will pull the standoff tight against the angle bracket. The 10mm boss is also slightly shorter than the thickness of the bearing so that it will hold the bearing securely. Today I will try to finish the angle brackets (drill the 4 holes in each of them). I got some different screws with slightly larger heads and 1 1/4" long. I am using 6mm washers for a snug fit around the 1/4" screws. The assembly will have a washer on both sides plus a lock washer.

You can see a video of my CNC lathe machining the 2nd operation on them here (http://www.cnczone.com/forums/showthread.php?p=514542#post514542).

Alan

Mr.Chips
10-17-2008, 12:06 PM
It has been several months since I really did anything on my router rebuild. I have been working on my CNC Lathe and using the router.

I didn't really like the idea of just using bolts and nuts for the bearing supports for my Y-axis, so, I spent some time thinking about what kind of solution that I would like. I designed a bearing standoff that would allow more precision assembly of the bearing brackets. I just finished yesterday turning 8 of them on my cnc lathe.

They have a 0.375 boss to fit into the holes on the angle brackets and a 10mm boss to fit a 6200 bearing. They are drilled and tapped thru for a 1/4x20 bolt. The 0.375 boss is only 0.120" long so that the screw will pull the standoff tight against the angle bracket. The 10mm boss is also slightly shorter than the thickness of the bearing so that it will hold the bearing securely. Today I will try to finish the angle brackets (drill the 4 holes in each of them). I got some different screws with slightly larger heads and 1 1/4" long. I am using 6mm washers for a snug fit around the 1/4" screws. The assembly will have a washer on both sides plus a lock washer.

You can see a video of my CNC lathe machining the 2nd operation on them here (http://www.cnczone.com/forums/showthread.php?p=514542#post514542).

Alan

Good to see you on the job again Alan.

I am a little confused but I may have missed it. In your first CNC you used Thompson bearing on the Y axis, so now you are using pipe and roller bearings, wouldn't the Thompson be more rigid?

Have you thought any about using two screws on the X axis seems that is the trend now, sounds like it would reduce racking on heavy cuts.

Good luck and keep the good pictures coming.
Hager

acondit
10-17-2008, 12:30 PM
Hager,

I am still using Thomson rails and bearings on the X-axis and the Z-axis, but I couldn't figure out a much better way to deal with the Y-axis than what Joe had done. However, I am still using Thomson rails instead of pipe on the Y-axis. I am just using conventional bearings (6000ZZ) running on the Thomson rails.

My experience with the single screw has been very good. Even with the slight amount of racking that I now get, I have been able to cut PCBs with my router. So I think the new design (based largely on Joe's Joe2006 design) with a top and bottom torsion box should work really well.

Alan

Mr.Chips
10-17-2008, 12:35 PM
Hager,

I am still using Thomson rails and bearings on the X-axis and the Z-axis, but I couldn't figure out a much better way to deal with the Y-axis than what Joe had done. However, I am still using Thomson rails instead of pipe on the Y-axis. I am just using conventional bearings (6000ZZ) running on the Thomson rails.

My experience with the single screw has been very good. Even with the slight amount of racking that I now get, I have been able to cut PCBs with my router. So I think the new design (based largely on Joe's Joe2006 design) with a top and bottom torsion box should work really well.

Alan

Is your Y Axis wider than the 1st machine so that is why you are nor using the original Thompson?

acondit
10-17-2008, 01:08 PM
Is your Y Axis wider than the 1st machine so that is why you are nor using the original Thompson?

Yes, and no. The inside dimension is actually still the same (34.5") but on my existing rails the ends were originally mounted in (2) 2.5" thick aluminum blocks and they didn't actually reach the full width (they were only 32.5" long). The new y-axis carriage is wider and the blocks would have significantly reduced my travel. So I bought 36" x 1" rails that are not predrilled for supports and am will be saving my old ones to reuse or resell.

Alan

Mr.Chips
10-17-2008, 01:42 PM
Yes, and no. The inside dimension is actually still the same (34.5") but on my existing rails the ends were originally mounted in (2) 2.5" thick aluminum blocks and they didn't actually reach the full width (they were only 32.5" long). The new y-axis carriage is wider and the blocks would have significantly reduced my travel. So I bought 36" x 1" rails that are not predrilled for supports and am will be saving my old ones to reuse or resell.

Alan

I understand.
I have been collecting ball screws and linerar bearings for some time for my second machine. And like you, I have changed my original plan, I have desided to replace the ball screw I had baught with a 5 start Acme Threaded rod on my Y axis which would have had a max. cut width of 36", because I want to make it wide enough to support cutting a 4' piece. And I'll use that ball screw as the 2nd screw on the X axis. I was lucky to get in on the initial price reduction of the new Gecko drives and I baught 4 so that is set.

My current machine in a fixed gantry because it was the easiest to build and also the most rigid with the equipment I had to build with. I like the torsion box approach on the base and it really lightens up the gantry weight, but I still need to do some research on whether to use torsion, extruded aluminum or whatever for the Y axis as I don't want to move any more mass than I have to but still keep it rigid. I have an alternative design in mind but want to test it before I become the laughing stock of the forum. He He

Hager

acondit
10-17-2008, 04:15 PM
Here are the completed Y-axis bearing supports. I designed the setup so that I could move all four bearings to the ends of the brackets rather than having to stagger the mountings.

Now I need to take the gantry back apart, paint it, slide the Z-axis carriage on and put it back together.

Alan

acondit
07-17-2009, 01:50 PM
I have been working on my optical limit switches for some time. I thought I would post and show where I am with them.

The first picture shows the three basic generations that my switch design has gone through. The first generation used discrete components (the picture shows one of the switches mounted on a tachometer test bed). The second generation was largely surface mount and about two thirds the size of the first generation. The third generation gets rid of the mounting holes and all extraneous circuitry and it is about 1/2 the size of the second generation.

The middle picture is just another shot of the 3rd gen. circuit.

The final picture shows how the circuit mounts in a carrier for mounting on a machine and using a solid flag (piece of metal or opaque material) to trip the switch (interrupt the light).

Alan

CarveOne
07-17-2009, 05:43 PM
Pretty cool Alan!

Questions:

1. Do you have any data from tests of repeatability at various speeds yet?

2. If the limit switch doesn't trigger or the axis doesn't stop for any reason will the axis pass on through without damage to the switch parts?

3. When can we buy them? :)

CarveOne

acondit
07-17-2009, 09:33 PM
Pretty cool Alan!

Questions:

1. Do you have any data from tests of repeatability at various speeds yet?

No, I haven't installed a single one as a limit switch yet. However, I have three working in my spindle encoder.


2. If the limit switch doesn't trigger or the axis doesn't stop for any reason will the axis pass on through without damage to the switch parts? That is the way these are designed. I am also working on a sealed unit that probably wouldn't withstand a collision. However, I hope that collisions won't be common.


3. When can we buy them? :) Not until after I test them.:)


CarveOne

CarveOne
07-18-2009, 06:50 AM
No, I haven't installed a single one as a limit switch yet. However, I have three working in my spindle encoder.

That is the way these are designed. I am also working on a sealed unit that probably wouldn't withstand a collision. However, I hope that collisions won't be common.

Not until after I test them.:)

Just mount them so that they shear off easily without serious damage. Use #4 or #6 nylon screws or something.

My first machine is slow enough that I haven't used the limit switches that I purchased. I just set up the soft limits and that has worked fine for what little I did with it so far. I was thinking that I would take the "belt and suspenders" approach with the second build and set the soft limits to act after the limit switches trip just in case there was a fault. Using normally closed contacts adds another level of safety. I'm a long way from having to be concerned about a runaway 1,000 IPM jog though.

Keep us updated on your progress with these.

CarveOne

acondit
07-18-2009, 11:56 AM
I plan to have enough travel on the enclosed switch to allow the machine to hit it and stop before colliding.

I have my machine set up so that it hits the switch, stops, backs off and hits it again traveling very slow to get better precision.

Alan

CarveOne
07-18-2009, 02:28 PM
I plan to have enough travel on the enclosed switch to allow the machine to hit it and stop before colliding.

I have my machine set up so that it hits the switch, stops, backs off and hits it again traveling very slow to get better precision.

Alan


That sounds like a good way to handle it.

CarveOne

acondit
07-29-2009, 06:20 PM
Ok, I no longer have a working router. I tore my first router apart to start building the second one. Should I start a new thread for the new build? Or, since I have shown the cutting of most of the pieces in this thread, should I just continue here with the build?

The advantage of a new thread is that I could collect all of the info about the new build in one place without the info about the first machine. The disadvantage is that I would probably need to repost a bunch of info that is already found in this thread.

Any suggestions?

Alan

ger21
07-29-2009, 06:21 PM
New. :)

Mr.Chips
07-29-2009, 06:24 PM
Hi Alan,

I vote for a new thread, nice and clean no confusion, cause I confuse easy, LOL :rainfro:

Looking forward to see your new build.
Hager

acondit
07-29-2009, 07:09 PM
Gerry and Hager,

Your wish is my command. Here is my new thread for my new build. Phoenix Rising from the Ashes or Second Router Build (http://www.cnczone.com/forums/showthread.php?t=86844)

Alan