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Thread: G0602 10x22 LATHE 3 STEP CNC CONVERSION

  1. #13
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    loving this keep the updates coming!



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    Thanks Reed!

    The electrical system is now finished. Here is the Computer/CNC electronics side.
    That's the Master Switch on the right. FC relay is inside the covered junction box. All of the outlets are turned off by the Master Switch, except one:


    And the Flood Cooling side. The flood cooling pump (Center outlet) is controlled by Mach3 through the relay--or by the manual switch. That covered junction box on the left will soon be partially buried under the wooden accessory cabinet. The last outlet on right is ALWAYS hot:


    This is what you want the tester to look like, on each outlet, when wiring is finished:


    CR.

    Last edited by Crevice Reamer; 06-08-2010 at 02:35 PM.
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    For flood cooling manifold, I am using this Grizzly magnetic base:

    http://grizzly.com/products/Magnetic...nt-Hoses/G9810

    It would cost almost $35 just to buy all that locline, nozzles and valves. AND it's a 175 pound pull base. Even though I will probably only use one hose, I consider it a teriffic bargain. The single hose manifold costs $6 less and only has a 125 pound pull base. I will use it wrapped in a plastic bag though, for swarf removal.

    Removing the supplied fluted tubing inlet allows a standard NPT 1/8 inch pipe nipple to be screwed in.



    CR.

    Last edited by Crevice Reamer; 06-07-2010 at 07:59 AM. Reason: Add pic
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    I find these lead screw observations to be interesting:

    A 17 Turns Per Inch lead screw (Stock X axis) running at 1000 RPM will yield travel speed of about 59 inches per minute.

    A 12 TPI screw (Stock Z axis) at 1K RPM yields 83 IPM.

    An 8 TPI Acme screw at 1K RPM yields 125 IPM

    A 5 TPI Ball screw at 1K RPM yields 200 IPM.


    After the last video, I turned the Z screw by hand. It was very hard to turn. This made me wonder if a 381 oz stepper would be enough to drive the stock screw.

    Upon further experimentation, it developed that when the half nut lever,


    is clamped down tightly, there's a binding on the screw and it's hard to turn. Loosening up the lever slightly makes a world of difference.

    My cordless drill has a torque chuck adjustment. This can be set, for example, so that a drywall screw will cease turning when it has reached the required tightness. Setting the drill for lowest torque should make a good test.

    In this video, the drill torque is set to 1, the lowest point. Set at 1, a slight squeeze of my hand will stop the drill spindle and it just clicks. Here we are also timing the speed over a set 10 inches. Sorry for the long delay, the drill safety was ON:



    NO CLICKS! A 381 should be PLENTY of motor. Fourteen seconds to move the carriage 10 inches with a 12 TPI screw = 42.5 IPM and 510 RPM.

    With the lever clamped down all the way it won't move at all on 1. Clicks until setting #4.

    Not bad for a depleted battery. This test WAS supposed to be done with a freshly charged battery. Charger was plugged in overnight. Seems that it's not enough to just plug charger into battery--You have to ALSO plug the OTHER end into wall outlet--DUH! Life is so complicated.

    CR.

    Last edited by Crevice Reamer; 06-08-2010 at 04:24 PM. Reason: Add pic.
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    I have a need for speed! Hooked up a faster drill on a better coupling shaft:


    And it runs twice as fast. That freight train is coming right at you! So as Samuel L Jackson said in Jurassic Park: "Hold onto your butts!"




    1028 RPM & about 86 IPM.

    CR.

    Last edited by Crevice Reamer; 06-08-2010 at 08:42 AM.
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    For some reason, Photobucket will only display the "Hold on to your butts" video at half speed. You can see the difference in the Video after it. They should both move the same speed. I have tried to fix it, but so far no luck.

    Metal and computer have arrived! Uploading pics now. Back shortly.

    CR.

    Last edited by Crevice Reamer; 06-08-2010 at 11:59 AM.
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    UPS left this on my sidewalk:


    What a load! those metal packages are HEAVY--Notice how the computer box is starting to crush.

    The computer was well packed:








    The all-important parallel port front & center:


    It will live HERE:




    The keyboard and mouse will live here:


    Since the KB table has to be able to tilt out of the way, both keyboard and mouse must be contained. I made these mounts out of crate strapping--Wonderful stuff. Good thing I'm not a packrat!


    Turns out, an optical mouse does not work well on a hard surface. Swapped it out for a ball-mouse--That works fine on the tile. Have the laser mouse on my mouse pad as I type this and I'm loving it.


    Here, the KB table, along with mouse and keyboard, is tilted up to its max:


    Let's fire it up:




    The monitor works well, but UH! OH! I didn't allow for the tilt factor with LCD screens. Have to rework the monitor mount to allow more up and down tilt adjustment:


    CR.

    Last edited by Crevice Reamer; 06-08-2010 at 10:47 AM.
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    Default G540 RACK MOUNT

    A tip: If you have multiple Tormach-tooling drill chuck adapters for your mill:


    And a QC toolpost with several 5/8 straight bore holders:


    You can remove that 5/8" insert:


    This leaves a 3/4 inch bore that is perfect for inserting TTS holders:


    Of course, if you have a 3/4-1 inch straight bore holder, that will work WITHOUT removing the insert.

    This makes a pretty good QC Drill chuck system. If you are going to use it manually, you will need to turn a 60 degree point on some 3/4 inch stock--to center the tool post. For CNC though, it's just QC and go.

    You can also turn down the Irwin-socket wrench tap holders to fit this 3/4 inch bore.

    This rack-mount allows a G540 to live on the tool box wall, just above the computer:


    Three sides of the G540 become heat sinks, while the wing nuts allow easy access.

    It was made in several steps, mostly on the lathe. This operation is a 1/2 inch diameter x 1/4 inch deep pocket cut into 6061 AL:



    CR.

    Last edited by Crevice Reamer; 06-10-2010 at 08:33 AM. Reason: Add Pic
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    Default MAJOR CNC ELECTRONICS INSTALLED

    Final mounting of G540 & PSU:


    To install wing nuts on G540 rack mount, would have meant having to empty and remove drawers. Drywall screws were easier. May install wing nuts later--OR not. Did I mention that crate strapping is wonderful stuff?

    Electronics bay:


    This area is well away from swarf, and located under up-tilted end of coolant basin. Coolant should never reach here. Just in case though, these electronics will have a galvanized steel umbrella-shield overhead.

    The Lathe Estop switch will double-duty for both spindle and electronics.

    Now to add motor mounts, steppers, index sensor, spindle relay and home switches. These components will be wired as installed.

    CR.

    Last edited by Crevice Reamer; 06-10-2010 at 09:47 AM.
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    Hey CR, this is a question that is over asked. But I have always respected your work so wanted to hear your answer. Why steppers over servos?



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    Quote Originally Posted by mattbesquare View Post
    Hey CR, this is a question that is over asked. But I have always respected your work so wanted to hear your answer. Why steppers over servos?
    Hi Matt! This question could be a whole new thread. (You should start one) I really don't want this thread to wander off-topic to such a controversial subject, but I'll answer you:

    Just speaking for me, but:

    Half the cost and complexity, (There is no SERVO G540) easy setup/installation--properly sized & Volted steppers have plenty of power/speed and do NOT lose steps. IMO, servos are not really necessary for our small non-industrial projects.

    CR.

    Last edited by Crevice Reamer; 06-10-2010 at 10:12 AM.
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    Don't be too sure about swarf not getting to your electronics. Swarf gets everywhere.

    You are making great progress - good on you.

    There is a servo drive roughly equivalent to the G540. The Uservo breakout board with it's Uservos fitted is similar.

    It has the spindle interface to a VFD, and even adds a pair of line voltage relays, whereas the G540 only has smaller DC relays.
    http://www.shop.cncdrive.com/index.php?productID=157
    I have brought one from CNCdrive.hu, and they were very quick to answer questions and ship. I have a set of Yasgawa 50W servos which are a good match, but haven't had a chance to set it up and test it yet.

    Regards,
    Mark


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G0602 10x22 LATHE 3 STEP CNC CONVERSION
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