Taig Lathe Threading


Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 12 of 13

Thread: Taig Lathe Threading

  1. #1
    Registered
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    226
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default Taig Lathe Threading

    Hey all,

    In a previous thread I decided to buy a Taig mill and am currently saving for it and in the meantime would like to pick up a lathe for my apartment after the new years rush and would like to ask a few questions.

    I have zero knowledge with a lathe and a night class is out of the question for many reasons so I am looking at the Virtual Machine Shop which is fine but not very well laid out to learn anything but free. While the dvd's at LMS like this or this while being geared for teaching are only 2 and 4hrs for $40?! My other search was youtube but while theirs alot of video theirs very little information. Any good tutorial sites that would setup a project and go step by step on setup, cutting, and finishing?

    I have read all the fights between the Taig & 7x/8x/9x's and have played with each of them in showrooms and believe that the Taig's build quality and accuracy is light years ahead of the Chinese lathes. Its also a wonderful size for an apartment desk. I will be turning aluminum & brass mostly making steam/stirling engines as well as would like to make custom rings as my fiance's hands are so small no jewelry shop sells things. (luckily she hates gold and diamonds and loves brass, aluminum and titanium) I would also like to cut gears but hobbing will definatly be down the road.

    The main reason people say not to buy the Taig seems to be because it lacks thread cutting capacity so I went looking for solutions and my word some of these gear assemblies are larger than the lathe is and it got me thinking...

    Im an Electrician/Electronics Engineer and have a few years of experience with pic micros so here are my ideas: Index heads are large plates with 60-50-40 holes and charts to figure out amount of rotations to get the desired # of holes per 360deg. I would just put a optical rotary encoder with 360 positions and output to three 7segment displays with a reset button and I would have a more accurate system for about $26. Over the last week my idea has gone overboard with encoders on all axis displaying on a cheep LCD with mm/in, axis index's, and controls as well as a small stepper driving a skrew on the slide for threading. I would select the required thread type and it would calculate the pulse rate for the stepper to achieve the cut, the index would say the length of the cut and a zero point for repeatability.

    If I get the Taig (which I think I will unless you talk me out of it) would anyone be interesting in such a product? I imagine it would cost about $175 but would be an invaluable addition to a manual lathe. Plus it gives me at least a few months of things to do while saving for the mill.

    So any reasons I shouldn't buy the Taig Mill? Any good full tutorial sites for turing/milling operations? Would you guys be interested in my DRO/Threader setup or is it only grandiose in my head?

    Thanks!

    Similar Threads:


  2. #2
    Registered
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    7
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default

    I think you have a good idea. I am out of the US for a while but I have a Taig Lathe in storage and I plan to CNC it in the future. Before I do that I be getting a Taig CNC mill from deepgroove on Ebay.

    Seeing the Slant Bed CNC conversion of a Taig Lathe thread here gives me a good idea of how to proceed in CNCing the Taig Lathe.



  3. #3
    Registered
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    usa
    Posts
    62
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default

    I would love to be able to cut threads on mine, I would be very interested in this



    Taig Owners Club.......
    Google Search. Taig Owners Club


  4. #4
    Registered
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    us
    Posts
    21
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TOC Admin View Post
    I would love to be able to cut threads on mine, I would be very interested in this

    If you know the spindle speed, cutting threads in Mach3 is straight forward and easy to do.



  5. #5
    Registered
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    usa
    Posts
    62
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default

    Yes but it would need to know exactly where the Spindle is in rotation also...

    So that you can check your threads and rerun them , Correct

    Taig Owners Club.......
    Google Search. Taig Owners Club


  6. #6
    Registered Jeff-Birt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    456
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default

    The best idea I think I have seen for threading on the Taig lathe is over on Nick Carters website: http://www.cartertools.com/brooketh.html. It's a fairly simple idea that should produce great results. The only downside is the need for reduced gearing (lower spindle speed).

    Jeff Birt


  7. #7
    Registered
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    28
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default

    The best idea I think I have seen for threading on the Taig lathe is over on Nick Carters website: http://www.cartertools.com/brooketh.html. It's a fairly simple idea that should produce great results. The only downside is the need for reduced gearing (lower spindle speed).

    This is only good for duplicating a thread i.e. you have to physically have a copy of the thread you are trying to reproduce.

    Im an Electrician/Electronics Engineer and have a few years of experience with pic micros so here are my ideas: Index heads are large plates with 60-50-40 holes and charts to figure out amount of rotations to get the desired # of holes per 360deg. I would just put a optical rotary encoder with 360 positions and output to three 7segment displays with a reset button and I would have a more accurate system for about $26. Over the last week my idea has gone overboard with encoders on all axis displaying on a cheep LCD with mm/in, axis index's, and controls as well as a small stepper driving a skrew on the slide for threading. I would select the required thread type and it would calculate the pulse rate for the stepper to achieve the cut, the index would say the length of the cut and a zero point for repeatability.

    If I get the Taig (which I think I will unless you talk me out of it) would anyone be interesting in such a product? I imagine it would cost about $175 but would be an invaluable addition to a manual lathe. Plus it gives me at least a few months of things to do while saving for the mill.

    So any reasons I shouldn't buy the Taig Mill? Any good full tutorial sites for turing/milling operations? Would you guys be interested in my DRO/Threader setup or is it only grandiose in my head?

    I, for one, would be very interested if something like this would be available.

    Thanks.



  8. #8
    Registered Jeff-Birt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    456
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default

    T
    his is only good for duplicating a thread i.e. you have to physically have a copy of the thread you are trying to reproduce.
    True. But for 99.99% of what most folks would do that is not a limitation as we are all working with standard sizes and a sample could easily be found.

    My own opinion is that by the time you start adding much more electromechanical automation you might as well make it a full blown CNC. YMMV.

    Jeff Birt


  9. #9
    Registered
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    us
    Posts
    21
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default

    I don't know what the big deal is, in Mach 3 as long as you have your back lash configured correctly and you know your speed Mach 3 does the rest for you.



  10. #10
    Registered
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    226
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default

    Hey all, sorry to start a thread and not reply to it but i got sent up to northern BC for work and have no internet in my hotel.

    Thanks for all the replies, I never thought of making a thread duplicator its such a basic concept I dont know why I never thought of it sooner! Unfortunatly its not what im after.

    The reason I am making a threader with supporting electronics is I have no experence machineing things and for at least the next year I want to do everything by hand so i know order of operations and such things. Eventually I will cnc the taig but not in the forseable future.

    I dont want any large gear changes or a thread duplicator as I want my idea to be simple, clean, and be a steppingstone to cnc so as to be usefull to more users. With the thread dupicator you have a host of extra metal and things that once you cnc its all getting removed anyways where as my idea will have these key points:

    99% of Taig users convert the compound table to acme or ballskrew setups as I am going to do as well. On one side you have a handwheel for manual operations and the other would be a small and simple 60-80ozin nema17 stepper which is small and has enough guts for the majority of work. One sensor to the pully to pickup speed and position and one output to the motor and I have my threader with digital interface. While im doing all the software im planing on implimenting three more inputs so it has DRO features as well but thats only after i have threading working.

    With a setup like this when you decide to goto cnc you would remove nothing at all just plug in conectors & sensors to the motion controler. Who knows if i go nutty I might even make mine stepper controled on all axis with my independent controls and have pc input for mach3 control but thats definatly a ways away still.

    Ill be home on the 23rd and will give a good writeup and drawings for those interested.

    Thanks!



  11. #11
    Registered
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    226
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default

    Ok so its not the 23rd but I had a lot more to do at home than I imagined, my hobby room is still knee deep and Ive got paperwork on every surface. I was going to make it pretty but a text explanation will half to do for now.

    My friend in Texas just sent my a 12V/15A 5000rpm motor that's about 3" round 5" long and would be ideal for my lathe spindle and at 15A it should have plenty of torque since it is an electric go-cart motor after all.

    So with the additon on a DC motor I need speed control and since I'm already building my DRO I figured I would throw some PWM into the design and have the spindle controlled digitally. Plus its cheaper as with a $5 mosfet (55V/30A) and a $5 relay for forward/reverse its a no brainer.

    Its a long text file so I will just post a link: HERE

    The threading screen needs work but with a 20x4 display its a bit of a tight squeeze to get things in sometimes, I could have used a 128x64pxl graphical LCD but it would add +$25 to the cost and I want to keep it down, Im using a massive 6"x2.5" character LCD right now and the total hardware cost for the setup excluding enclosure and nice connectors is ~$35



  12. #12
    Registered
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    usa
    Posts
    62
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sprinter View Post
    I don't know what the big deal is, in Mach 3 as long as you have your back lash configured correctly and you know your speed Mach 3 does the rest for you.
    I have never run a thread and have it perfect first time, got to count in tool deflection.etc.

    therefore you would have to rerun the thread after making an offset change to correct it.....

    Taig Owners Club.......
    Google Search. Taig Owners Club


Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


About CNCzone.com

    We are the largest and most active discussion forum for manufacturing industry. The site is 100% free to join and use, so join today!

Follow us on


Our Brands

Taig Lathe Threading
Taig Lathe Threading