How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building - Page 4

Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 37 to 48 of 66

Thread: How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building

  1. #37
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    1508
    Downloads
    2
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building

    This is a great thread. While I am not interested in building guitars I love watching your progress and all the special tools and fixtures you are using, as well as the methods you have in your work flow. Nice to see all the detailed images in excellent quality. Thanks for sharing this.

    https://adapting-camera.blogspot.com
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_vrAWOz5YGX6_e3qtXg3YA


  2. #38
    Registered
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    238
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building

    ok, good progress this week. I've been making sure i get out to the shop each night after work, even if only for an hour or two.

    Time to start building a body. I've got an INCREDIBLE set of claro walnut that (IIRC) I got from Oregon Wild Woods (toneswoods.com)

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2261-jpg

    I CNC'd some new spacers for the ends of the guitar mold so that I have a totally solid surface to press against when I glue up the
    sides to the head and tail blocks and had the molds spaced out for maximum height.

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2285-jpg

    The sides being glued up.

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2286-jpg

    After I joined the back plates together, I put it on the CNC and ran program to cut the dado down the centerline for the inlay strip/reinforcement. I use the "creep up"
    method here. I have a program with the measured dimension of the inlay strip, and then several programs incrementing at 2 thousandths additional each run. So I just
    keep running the wider programs until the strip fits snug. This one ended at a total of 4 thou over and a perfect press fit.

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2291-jpg

    Then I run the outline contour and leave tabs in it to give it strength until I get the inlay actually glued in (there was only .030" of joint left after the dado! In the future
    I plan to have a vacuum based jig for holding the plate while it's cut.

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2293-jpg

    Here it is with the inlay strip pressed into place.

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2296-jpg



  3. #39
    Registered
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    238
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building

    And now that sides are together, time to use the CNC for some profiling magic. I actually figured out how to have the CNC profile
    the sides for me for the beveled armrest and also the back profiling at 15 foot radius (including the taper from 4" down to 3 1/8" at the headblock.

    First I need to center the assembly jig using a long bit so that the Z axis doesn't collide with my sides. In reality, I've saved the work offset of this jig, but I like to double
    check it.

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2298-jpg

    The first operation just roughs the beveled armrest profile and leaves 3mm in case of tearout.

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2301-jpg

    Then the second operation spirals in from the sides with a climb cut to make sure there is no tearout.

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2304-jpg

    Here's the armrest blocking I made earlier. It is a perfect fit to the side profile now.

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2306-jpg


    In the following pictures I've flipped the mold over so the sides can be profiled for the back. Same approach, a roughing op that tapers the sides from the
    tailblock down to the headlock (3/4" drop), it leaves 3 mm, then climb cuts from the side to get a clean cut. After that, I can just glue on the kerfing a little
    high and a quick sanding on the radius dish for a perfect no stress fit of the back.

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2307-jpg

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2309-jpg

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2311-jpg

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2312-jpg

    It also bevels the head and tailblock surfaces so they match the curvature of the back.

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2313-jpg

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2314-jpg

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2319-jpg

    Here's the body mock up!

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2327-jpg



  4. #40
    Registered
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    238
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building

    OK, running of things to do with the CNC but there are a few more!

    Today I made the bridge. This is a custom design of my own, it was actually the first thing I designed on the Fusion360 learning curve.

    First I made a new vacuum jig for the bridge, since ver 1. didn't have enough room for the z axis touch plate. I made this from more VHMW, but I've decided not
    to use this anymore. Unlike the first pieces I used, these came slightly warped. The piece for the new neck vacuum jig was warped in two directions and is not usable.
    I contacted TapPlastics and they told me this is typical. So after some research, I'll be making all future vacuum jigs from surplus Corian stock. It is flat and very non-pourus. Plus, it will look like granite! :-)


    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2336-jpg

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2337-jpg

    First I surface the blank to thickness

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2340-jpg

    Then I drill the bridge pin holes and slot for the saddle. The holes don't go all they way through to preserve the vacuum, and also it's easier to
    use a vacuum clamp for bridge installation.

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2342-jpg

    chamfering the holes and the slot

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2344-jpg

    Contouring the bridge outline just to get rid of the excess. I remove it before continuing on

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2347-jpg

    Z-axis touch plate for zeroing

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2348-jpg

    Roughing the bridge to shop, I lave about 2mm of material

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2349-jpg

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2350-jpg

    Then a parallel operation with .005" (.125 mm) stepover for an almost perfect finish. Very little sanding needed.

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2352-jpg

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2356-jpg



  5. #41
    Registered
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    363
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building

    Looking great I like your methods the bridge came out nice .I was thinking that I have so many sizes I would like to make on a number of Instruments ,maybe I could have a work offset for a one size work board . Say a 2 x 2 foot and work all the different sizes from that or something like it .



  6. #42
    Registered
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    238
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building

    so last night I decided to make a neck caul to help in clamping the fretboard onto the neck. I usually put it in the go-bar deck, but I need
    a little pressure this to make sure it lays flat (long story, don't ask).

    So I got onto F360 and modeled a caul with a concave surface perfectly matched to the neck model (just did a solid subtraction on the two parts),
    and then CNC'd it last night. Came out with a perfect fit, and now I can use regular woodworking F-clamps on it.

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2370-jpg

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2372-jpg

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2373-jpg

    How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building-img_2374-jpg



  7. #43
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    1508
    Downloads
    2
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building

    Hi,

    Do you mind me asking what sort of plastic you are using for the vacuum fixtures? Trying to guess, but it is difficult. The one in this post and others looks like something else than POM but I cant guess what it is. Like I said, it is a very interesting thread, I have never seen guitar making in such detail and never had an idea about how much work it is behind the I have in my house... even if you have not made that one.

    https://adapting-camera.blogspot.com
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_vrAWOz5YGX6_e3qtXg3YA


  8. #44
    Registered
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    238
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building

    Quote Originally Posted by A_Camera View Post
    Hi,

    Do you mind me asking what sort of plastic you are using for the vacuum fixtures? Trying to guess, but it is difficult. The one in this post and others looks like something else than POM but I cant guess what it is. Like I said, it is a very interesting thread, I have never seen guitar making in such detail and never had an idea about how much work it is behind the I have in my house... even if you have not made that one.
    They are vhmw but as I mentioned a couple posts ago I'll be using corian now to avoid warping.



  9. #45
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    1508
    Downloads
    2
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building

    Quote Originally Posted by Kosh View Post
    They are vhmw but as I mentioned a couple posts ago I'll be using corian now to avoid warping.
    Thanks for the information.

    https://adapting-camera.blogspot.com
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_vrAWOz5YGX6_e3qtXg3YA


  10. #46
    Registered
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    238
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building

    Quote Originally Posted by A_Camera View Post
    Hi,

    Do you mind me asking what sort of plastic you are using for the vacuum fixtures? Trying to guess, but it is difficult. The one in this post and others looks like something else than POM but I cant guess what it is. Like I said, it is a very interesting thread, I have never seen guitar making in such detail and never had an idea about how much work it is behind the I have in my house... even if you have not made that one.
    @a-camera

    Hadn't thought about Pom (delrin). Have you used it? Is it stable ?(flat for large pieces)?



  11. #47
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    1508
    Downloads
    2
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building

    Quote Originally Posted by Kosh View Post
    @a-camera

    Hadn't thought about Pom (delrin). Have you used it? Is it stable ?(flat for large pieces)?
    Yes, I use that for many things, but never actually made anything large so I don't know how flat it remains, but as far as I know the material is very stable. It is pretty heavy, solid and easy to machine. You can thread it and work with it as you would with aluminium but can mill it faster. No cooling necessary, very nice to work with, I like it. The material is very strong and temperature and humidity stable. If it is suitable as vacuum fixture, I don't know. Perhaps not because it is a "low friction material, when milled everything easily slides off, which is why it is suitable for backlash-free nut as well. No lubrication necessary for good, easy and even rotation. I made custom nuts for my first CNC using POM, it worked very well, almost as a ball nut.

    https://adapting-camera.blogspot.com
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_vrAWOz5YGX6_e3qtXg3YA


  12. #48
    Registered
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    238
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building

    Ok, I didn't get good pictures, but today I installed my tail grafts. I say plural because due to the floating neck design I use, I have to graft both ends of the body.

    So I have this tail graft jig from luthiertools.com (themselves a good source of CNC produced luthier jigs). It takes a template which can be used to route the tail graft and also route the inlay itself.

    But what Ive done instead is make a custom template, and also modeled the inlay in CAD. So I CNC'd the template, then CNC'd the inlay, then used the template in the jig to route the pocket.

    Perfect fit as you can see.









Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  


About CNCzone.com

    We are the largest and most active discussion forum for manufacturing industry. The site is 100% free to join and use, so join today!

Follow us on


Our Brands

How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building
How I use CNC in acoustic guitar building