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Thread: Haas door locks

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    Thumbs down Haas door locks

    Has anyone come up with a fix for the door locks on the new haas machines?????

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    Why, are they broken? Disabling any door switch that was provided by a manufacture opens the shop owner, manager, and maintenance department up for huge personal lawsuits, and OSHA fines. Yes they are a pain in the arse, but only going to get more restrictive as time goes on.



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    Registered Donkey Hotey's Avatar
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    There IS a point where these stupid interlocks actually make the machine MORE dangerous. Not being able to see the part when you're trying to do some manual operation (facing on a lathe for example) is just begging for trouble. OSHA doesn't seem to have any problem with the operator taking the work to a manual machine that is totally open and exposed. I don't know why being a CNC makes that any different.

    Greg


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    Default haas door locks

    lol... push the settings button once maybe twice. you should see about 1/4 of the way down the page door hold override or something to that extent . get the cursor on it and press the arrow key. then press write/enter. that will solve your problem.. oh and you will have to do this everyday when you turn the machine on.



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    How restrictive are the new door locks? Currently, don't the machine automatically go into feed hold and drop the rpm if the doors are opened, and you can't do tool change while the doors are open. Isn't that pretty safe already?



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    Door override is setting 51 on a '08 VF2



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    Quote Originally Posted by Donkey Hotey View Post
    There IS a point where these stupid interlocks actually make the machine MORE dangerous. Not being able to see the part when you're trying to do some manual operation (facing on a lathe for example) is just begging for trouble. OSHA doesn't seem to have any problem with the operator taking the work to a manual machine that is totally open and exposed. I don't know why being a CNC makes that any different.
    Your using logic and government in the same context. You should know better It's because a bridgport does not have a tool changer, high RPM's, or automatic operation. There are several pages of interlock conditions in ANZI, Basicaly if the machine is under a certain size, and has a ATC, interlocks are mandatory. No ATC, and it's not concidered a machining center. Lathes are the same, if no turret or automatic tool changer, it's not concidered a turning center. If the machines were built to the latest CE spec, then no spindle operation with the door open. If they were built to ANZI then some spindle operation is ok. It's a whole can o worms for sure.



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    Our health & safety team came out a few years ago and started putting guarding on all the machines that they felt were dangerous.

    They seriously wanted to put metal guarding all the way around the spindle on "that big drillpress thing" (Bridgeport). It took about 10 minutes of explaining as to why that was neither practical or possible, given all the different operationes that get done on it.

    Then they got to the belt sander. They put a nice sheetmetal guard over the top roller and down the back of the belt. That created a nice pinch point at the top where you could get your hand caught if you did happen to bump into the belt while using the backside on a curved part. One day, after fighting my work around their POS guard, I calmly unbolted it, bent it up to make sure it would never work again and threw it in the trash.

    Don't get me started on the 24" press brake they put the interlock on so you had to operate it one-handed.

    Greg


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    Quote Originally Posted by Donkey Hotey View Post
    Our health & safety team came out a few years ago and started putting guarding on all the machines that they felt were dangerous.

    They seriously wanted to put metal guarding all the way around the spindle on "that big drillpress thing" (Bridgeport). It took about 10 minutes of explaining as to why that was neither practical or possible, given all the different operationes that get done on it.

    Then they got to the belt sander. They put a nice sheetmetal guard over the top roller and down the back of the belt. That created a nice pinch point at the top where you could get your hand caught if you did happen to bump into the belt while using the backside on a curved part. One day, after fighting my work around their POS guard, I calmly unbolted it, bent it up to make sure it would never work again and threw it in the trash.

    Don't get me started on the 24" press brake they put the interlock on so you had to operate it one-handed.

    Wow, we must work for the same company



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    Hitting the Cycle start button 100 times a day has caused a repetitive motion injury to my wrist and now I'm on workmans comp leave for 6 months, maybe longer if I can get it diagnosed as a permanent disability...

    So don't make fun of OSHA, they helped to make me some money...






    Just Kidding BTW....=)



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    Quote Originally Posted by Chrliev View Post
    Hitting the Cycle start button 100 times a day has caused a repetitive motion injury to my wrist and now I'm on workmans comp leave for 6 months, maybe longer if I can get it diagnosed as a permanent disability...

    So don't make fun of OSHA, they helped to make me some money...

    Just Kidding BTW....=)
    that's a good one



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    Worked for a place about a year ago that was extremely noisy. Everything was in one big room with 20 foot ceilings: Metal cutting saws (they cut aluminum plate with a craftsman table saw) shears, CNC mills, lathes, mills, assembly with hammers etc. and people blasting radios all day.

    It was so bad that by the end of the day you were a nervous wreck. An owners son-in-law called OSHA to complain and they came out. Gigged us for some minor stuff, but said the noise was not loud enough at a constant level to cite.

    OHSA also wanted us to put a guard on the drill press. They owners were so pissed about someone calling OHSA and costing them a bunch of money, they they took the drill press out instead of installing the guard. We tried to tell them we needed the drill press, but they would not listen. Can you imagine any shop without a simple drill press!!!

    Talking about cutting off your nose to spite your face. Ha ha!

    And, they never found out who called!!!!

    P.S.: I used to be the safety person at a big grinding house in California and so I had to go to Cal OHSA training classes. Under Cal OHSA regulations, almost everything is a hazardous substance, they even classified water as a hazardous substance.

    Mike

    Last edited by Machineit; 03-16-2011 at 04:39 PM. Reason: added P.S.
    Haas VF-2, HA5C, Hardinge CHNC 1, BobCAD V23


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