Old patent translation

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    Default Old patent translation

    Hi everybody! I do not speak German, however I am hoping some of the people who frequent this forum speak English and can help me out.

    I am a photographer, and I live in Nova Scotia, Canada. I am trying to translate an old Swiss patent, written in German, from 1936. I was doing a good job using Google Translate for the first couple of sections, then, once the technical descriptions of the schematics began, there was a big breakdown. I have the patent as a .pdf, and it describes the inner workings of an old clockwork-driven camera. I am hoping to translate the patent and build a reproduction of the camera for a new photography project.

    If anybody has the ability, would you be able to assist me in translating this document? I am happy to type out all of the text, in German, and provide it to any interested person(s). The entire document is 2,267 words total, though some of that I already have translated (the non-technical portions).

    Thank you all for your time!

    BEN WOOTEN

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    Quote Originally Posted by bwooten2 View Post
    Hi everybody! I do not speak German, however I am hoping some of the people who frequent this forum speak English and can help me out.

    I am a photographer, and I live in Nova Scotia, Canada. I am trying to translate an old Swiss patent, written in German, from 1936. I was doing a good job using Google Translate for the first couple of sections, then, once the technical descriptions of the schematics began, there was a big breakdown. I have the patent as a .pdf, and it describes the inner workings of an old clockwork-driven camera. I am hoping to translate the patent and build a reproduction of the camera for a new photography project.

    If anybody has the ability, would you be able to assist me in translating this document? I am happy to type out all of the text, in German, and provide it to any interested person(s). The entire document is 2,267 words total, though some of that I already have translated (the non-technical portions).

    Thank you all for your time!

    BEN WOOTEN
    How 'bout post the PDF here and you can "crowd source" a translation?

    CAD, CAM, Scanning, Modelling, Machining and more. http://www.mcpii.com/3dservices.html


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    The funny thing is, I've been at this for a couple of weeks now, working with this Swiss patent application... and about 30 minutes after posting this requests here on the forums, through some research at a photography museum, I actually found a stash of the same patent that the same inventor applied for in Great Britain, France, and Belgium.

    I'm comparing them side-by-side now, and everything checks out... so my problem is solved! I just had not looked deep enough.

    Thanks for your response and offer, however, I appreciate it!

    Best,

    BEN



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    Talking Re: Old patent translation

    This is Amanda Wang from Beijing China, and our department in a Publishing House is dealing with patent transaltion. If anybody in the forum has such need, please let us know.



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    Default Re: Old patent translation

    I know that this is an old thread, but I thought that I'd chip in with some additional information that may be useful for someone out there who needs to obtain a translation of a patent document..

    bwooten2's strategy of finding a translation of a patent specification without going to the trouble of preparing his own translation (e.g. using Google Translate) or paying for a professional translation is a common one amongst we patent attorneys.

    The espacenet website (https://worldwide.espacenet.com/), which is run by the European Patent Office, is particularly useful for implementing the strategy because its records cover not only European patents but also patents for many non-European countries. Also, it's free to search.

    To use the website to find a translation, just enter the number of the patent you want to translate into the search box. (From what I remember, it can be a bit finicky about how the number is entered and maybe even the type (i.e. grant, application, publication) of number that is entered. Consequently, if you don't enter the number correctly, or you don't enter the right type of number, it will not locate the patent document you're searching for even if it's actually recorded in the espacenet records.)

    Assuming that you locate the patent you're trying to translate on espacenet, click on its summary listing so that the full details of the patent are displayed. The detailed patent listing should include a patent family list which lists all of the patents that are related to the patent. As an example, let's say that your searching for an English translation of a Swiss patent application like bwooten2 was, and that the applicant who filed that application also filed associated patent applications in China, Russia, and the United States because they wanted patent protection in each of those countries as well as in Switzerland (remember, patents are territorial and only provide protection in the particular country/region in which they are granted). These three other applications are said to be family members of the Swiss application.

    If possible, once you locate the patent family list, click on a family member that was filed in a country whose official language is the same as the language you wish to translate the original patent into. You may then be taken to the details for the selected family member patent which may include the translation that you're after. If the translation is not available on espacenet, it may indicate where a copy of the translation can be obtained. For example, it may indicate that a copy of the family member you're after can be found on the WIPO patentscope website (https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/search.jsf) or on the patent website of a particular country (e.g. the USPTO website - https://www.uspto.gov/patents-applic...search-patents). Just follow your nose and you should eventually find a copy of the family member that you're looking for.

    Also, if espacenet doesn't actually have a copy of the family member, another option is to enter the grant, application, or publication number of the family member into Google Patents (https://patents.google.com/). This can be an easier way of finding patent family members compared to the previously mentioned method.

    If you can't find a family member of the patent in the language that you need, the next best option may be to prepare a translation using a machine translator like Google Translate (https://translate.google.com.au/). Assuming you want to avoid having to manually type in the text of the patent you want to translate, it's best to electronically copy (e.g. using the ctrl v shortcut on your keyboard) the text of the patent from an electronic copy of the patent that allows for such copying to be performed, and to then paste the text into Google Translate so that it can then translate it into the language you desire. If you're only able to get your hands on a copy of the patent that does not allow for electronic copying (e.g. a pdf document that does not allow text in the document to be copied), there's always the option to perform optical character recognition (OCR) on the document which will produce a copyable electronic version of the document. I've used the following free online ocr service to do this: http://www.onlineocr.net/.

    When using Google Translate to translate a large patent document, I would usually break the document up into chunks and translate each chunk separately. One of the reasons that I would do this is because I often found that it usually resulted in a better quality machine translation. However, Google Translate may have improved siince then and it may therefore no longer be necessary to do this.

    Also, I should mention that it appears that espacenet has a free online translator now, so this may be a more convenient way of obtaining a translation.

    If all else fails, and you're unable to source a free translation from anywhere, there's always the option of using a professional translator like RWS (http://www.rws.com/) which is a well-known professional patent translation service provider. When I used them, they offered two levels of patent translation service. One is just a normal translation that is of the usual quality which is useful for just everyday things like finding out what a patent document discloses, etc. The other is a higher quality and more precise translation that is required for things like providing a validity or an infringement opinion. As you would probably expect, the higher quality translation service is more expensive than the normal translation service.

    I've probably missed mentioning a few things in the above, but Iit should at least give anyone who reads this a better idea of how to go about obtaining a translation of a patent document should they need to do so at some point.

    Dave

    Hobby machinist who's just starting out with cnc


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