The all in one, 'how do I' and 'look at this!' thread...


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Thread: The all in one, 'how do I' and 'look at this!' thread...

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    Registered Arbo's Avatar
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    Default The all in one, 'how do I' and 'look at this!' thread...

    Figured since in general C1's threads have been taken over with all sorts of other things, maybe we need a thread in a better spot for all the normal chatter that is seen in them (and in other ones) about projects being worked on, projects finished, questions about machines, questions about software, questions about wood, cutters, etc.

    So here we are.

    I'll start with one, I had been using a .25 downcut EM to do all my cutout tool paths... on occasion I'd get tearout when going around a corner. So this last run I did, I switched to an up-cut bit. Big mistake. Tear out on the 'face' of the cut in spots, and the actual cut out cut is rough and nasty.

    So what do others use for cutouts, do they have the same issues, and how do they handle them?

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    Wood neophyte.


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    Community Moderator ger21's Avatar
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    I'm assuming the tearout occurs when going from "across the grain", around the corner to "with the grain".
    One thing you can do is start with an oversized piece that large enough to leave some wood on the waste side of the bit. This will minimize tearout.
    Sometimes climb cutting will give better results, sometimes not.
    As you've noticed, downcuts tend to tearout less, but not always.

    If you're cutting rectangular shaped parts, here's one thing you can do.
    rather than cutting around your part, do the cuts for each side separately. Do the crosscuts (across the grain) first, then do the rip cuts (with the grain).
    The crossgrain cuts may need to be done in shallower passes to prevent tearout, but if you have plenty of extra width, it shouldn't be an issue.

    There are a lot of subtleties involved that can affect the outcome.

    Gerry

    UCCNC 2017 Screenset
    http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/2017.html

    Mach3 2010 Screenset
    http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/2010.html

    JointCAM - CNC Dovetails & Box Joints
    http://www.g-forcecnc.com/jointcam.html

    (Note: The opinions expressed in this post are my own and are not necessarily those of CNCzone and its management)


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    Registered Arbo's Avatar
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    I think just about everything I cut has extra waste wood on the outside of the cut... so I am good there. Oddly, most of my tear outs with a DC bit are usually when going with the grain to across the grain.

    The single cuts is an interesting idea, not sure how to set that up in vectric or rhino, but will have to write it down and look into it.

    How much does sharpness of the bit play into it? I know I've used my DC quite a lot, maybe it's dulling..

    Wood neophyte.


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    Signing up for this thread. So far I'm using Whiteside upcut spiral's and haven't noticed any significant tearout in oak. I know I had some trouble with a piece of walnut that I had joined together to get a wider piece. I ended up with a split piece of wood.

    Colten Edwards [URL="http://www.cncsigns.ca"]http://www.cncsigns.ca[/URL]


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    Community Moderator ger21's Avatar
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    Oddly, most of my tear outs with a DC bit are usually when going with the grain to across the grain.
    You should almost never get tearout from that?? perhaps we're not on the same page here with out terminology.


    How much does sharpness of the bit play into it? I know I've used my DC quite a lot, maybe it's dulling..
    It can play a huge role, but that can be very dependent on the specific piece of wood.

    If you get tearout along the grain, leaving about .01" of material and doing a cleanup pass can help. Usually this is caused by grain direction issues, but some woods are more prone to tearout than others.

    Can you post a picture of where you're getting the tearout?

    Gerry

    UCCNC 2017 Screenset
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    Mach3 2010 Screenset
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    JointCAM - CNC Dovetails & Box Joints
    http://www.g-forcecnc.com/jointcam.html

    (Note: The opinions expressed in this post are my own and are not necessarily those of CNCzone and its management)


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    Registered Arbo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ger21 View Post
    Can you post a picture of where you're getting the tearout?
    Next time I cut something, which shouldn't be too long of a wait, as all I've been doing for 4 days is running my machine. Will get a shot of it on the machine.

    Wood neophyte.


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    A 14" Aztec in the works. So far cut, primed to seal it, hammered copper on the front. Just sprayed the back to let it cure overnight. Might get to putting stain in the crevices tomorrow. Clear after all of that.

    I don't know how others got the hammered copper to spray down in the carvings without spraying on too much and losing detail. You can see my white primer down in some of them. But they will be covered with stain...

    Wood neophyte.


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    Try standing the calendar on the edge at nearly 90 degrees for the first two or three light coats, laying it flat right after spraying. Don't put on enough to create runs. It's hard to fill the crevasses if the can is at an angle to the surface. The last coat can be heavier and sprayed at all angles while laying flat.

    I finally found a few cans of the Rustoleum hammered gold that I snapped up. Saving it for another calendar and other projects some day.

    CarveOne
    http://www.carveonecncwoodcraft.com


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    Quote Originally Posted by Arbo View Post
    A 14" Aztec in the works. So far cut, primed to seal it, hammered copper on the front. Just sprayed the back to let it cure overnight. Might get to putting stain in the crevices tomorrow. Clear after all of that.

    I don't know how others got the hammered copper to spray down in the carvings without spraying on too much and losing detail. You can see my white primer down in some of them. But they will be covered with stain...
    was that v-carved or 3d toolpathed? It looks a lot smoother than what I last made with vcarve.



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    Alan, it was v-carved. I think it's the best one I have done so far in terms of detail and such.

    Wood neophyte.


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    Registered Arbo's Avatar
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    Theoretical question:

    If you were limited on your work space, what one piece of equipment (other than your CNC) would you absolutely need?

    Drill Press, table saw, band saw, jointer, planer, desktop multi-sander, drum sander, crosscut saw, etc...

    Wood neophyte.


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    Community Moderator ger21's Avatar
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    Each one does something different, so that question is nearly impossible to answer.

    I have all the tools you mentioned, and my table saw gets used the most often by a large margin.
    But, it can't do what any of the other tools do.

    Gerry

    UCCNC 2017 Screenset
    http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/2017.html

    Mach3 2010 Screenset
    http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/2010.html

    JointCAM - CNC Dovetails & Box Joints
    http://www.g-forcecnc.com/jointcam.html

    (Note: The opinions expressed in this post are my own and are not necessarily those of CNCzone and its management)


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The all in one, 'how do I' and 'look at this!' thread...
The all in one, 'how do I' and 'look at this!' thread...