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Thread: bolton cnc lathe

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    bolton cnc lathe

    Can anyone give their input in refference to the bolton cnc lathe. If any one has purchased this machine and has any review of this machine. Your in put would be greatly appriciated.

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    Bolton CNC lathe user highly recommends it

    For those asking (or skeptical) about a Bolton CNC lathe, here is my opinion as an owner . . .

    We are a small shop with a limited budget, running a Hurco MB1 mill interfaced with Bobcad V21 and wanted to expand to an economical CNC lathe.

    Bolton had the ONLY new lathe under $10,000 that had a decent set of features, such as an auto tool changer, true rigid tapping, RS-232 connection, multi-start tapered threading and threading cycles, roughing and other basic (and necessary) lathe cycles etc.

    I was a little skeptical at first as to whether you really do get what they promise. Believe me, these lathes are exceptional value for money. The hardware and software that really count are excellent. I've just finished running 650 3/8" brass nuts with drilling, turning, parting etc and detected less than 1/10,000 error in repeatability.

    The frame is rigid, the programming easy (with an interface to external g-code), tool wear offsets are accounted for with ease, parameter setting and tool set-up are a breeze. This lathe is awesome. The instruction manual is comprehensive and simple to follow as well.

    You probably would not want to run a million stainless steel castings on them, but, hey, for our shop this lathe will do 90 percent of our work and keep in mind the value for money.

    I highly recommend them.

    One last note. I had a lot of questions to ask the Bolton staff, and their customer service is incredible. Each question was answered clearly and often within the hour.

    steve
    shop supervisor



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    I think the proof is in pictures and video!



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    Proof is on the Bolton website as well

    I agree,

    So, take a look at the Bolton site and see a couple of examples . . .



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    What accessories does it come with. I noticed it is built on an engine lathe platform with a camlock type spindle. 4Jaw, 3Jaw, steady rest, follow rest, drill chuck etc etc. If it has a steady rest is it one of those with bearing rollers and teh head that opens and closes? Can you mount a rear mounted cut off tool on the cross slide? Is there an advantage in buying the heavier model?



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    Bolton lathe accesories

    Hi there,

    Sorry for the delayed reply, as I don't check CNC zone as often as I should.

    The lathe comes with a 3 jaw, and they sell a 4 jaw for a couple of hundred dollars. There is not a drill chuck included, but it does have a dead center (note; not a live one), no steady either. The morse 5 spindle hole is handy, as you can adapt to 5C collects or whatever. A rear cut-off could be accommodated, and we might do that, except we change jobs so often that it would be in the way most of the time. A better option would be using it in a gang-turning setting (multiple tools along the cross slide) to increase the tool numbers. We run multiple drills out of one tool position (i.e. a block that holds a center drill, main drill and countersink).

    My reason to buy was not dependent on the accessories that most of us have in our shops anyway.

    We chose the heavier model for the higher speed range, double-sized steppers and claim to precision turning - which it does! The cast iron base also has a leg dedicated to the coolant tank and pump.

    After 20 or more different types of jobs, we are 100% happy with this lathe.

    Hope this answers your questions.

    steve



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    Quote Originally Posted by speacock View Post
    Hi there,

    We run multiple drills out of one tool position (i.e. a block that holds a center drill, main drill and countersink).
    steve
    Thanks for the answers. The seller doesn't seem to know much about this thing. Got pictures of the "mini drilling block." seems like a good idea. Is there a way to mount a follwo rest on teh saddle if I wanted to? So you are saying teh cast iron base is way better than the lighter model. I have learned my lesson in the past about penny wise dollar stupid. Whats teh biggest rough cut you ever took with that machine without any sounds or other issues and in what material?

    Thanks for all teh help so much. I plan on sometimes having to do long and slender like .600 tubing 10" long. Maybe I will have to get used to applying a back taper and just working between centers with light DOC.



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    Quote Originally Posted by speacock View Post
    Hi there,

    Sorry for the delayed reply, as I don't check CNC zone as often as I should.

    The lathe comes with a 3 jaw, and they sell a 4 jaw for a couple of hundred dollars. There is not a drill chuck included, but it does have a dead center (note; not a live one), no steady either. The morse 5 spindle hole is handy, as you can adapt to 5C collects or whatever. A rear cut-off could be accommodated, and we might do that, except we change jobs so often that it would be in the way most of the time. A better option would be using it in a gang-turning setting (multiple tools along the cross slide) to increase the tool numbers. We run multiple drills out of one tool position (i.e. a block that holds a center drill, main drill and countersink).

    My reason to buy was not dependent on the accessories that most of us have in our shops anyway.

    We chose the heavier model for the higher speed range, double-sized steppers and claim to precision turning - which it does! The cast iron base also has a leg dedicated to the coolant tank and pump.

    After 20 or more different types of jobs, we are 100% happy with this lathe.

    Hope this answers your questions.

    steve
    Hmmm, you seem to be a salesman for Bolton Lathe, posing as a machinist who bought one, anyone else see this? A machinist would not have said 1/10,000 error. They would have mentioned the tolerance the thing can hold in inches or millimeters, your cover is blown. Also the only posts you have made are about this lathe. I think there is more than one shill in here. People these days make me want to puke, does anyone have any morality about them any more?



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    I am a machinist, not a salesman

    I'm sorry you got the wrong impression and have read into my replies MUCH more than is intended.

    I am a machinist, toolmaker, actually, in a shop with a small budget and we needed a lathe.

    I have no interest or sales link in Bolton, just giving my honest opinion. Nor am I a salesman. Yes, I added one too many zeros, the lathe hold 1/10 of a thou. Sorry about the typo!

    By the way, as you questioned my credibility, I've just converted my old Bridgeport knee mill to CNC using old steppers, rails and drivers from another place, so I am quite capable of commenting on CNC equipment. We did this conversion, again, to save money and increase productivity.

    While you are off puking, I'll be out in my shop using a Hurco MB1, my Bolton lathe and my new Bridgeport converted mill!

    And keep in mind, if I had lied, that WOULD be immoral. You had better consider your own morality, hadn't you?

    steve



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    I can't stop laughing. Anyone who is impressed with that slow moving piece of garbage hasn't seen a CNC made after 1975. I think I could make parts faster manually with a hand tied behind my back. You must either be very new to machining or in a coma for the last 35 years. Either that or you are selling those things on the side. I think it is the latter. All your posts are raving about something a weekend hobbyist would be ashamed to own.



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    OK dualkit, I'm all ears. You got a better option for under $10,000. BTW, I also need 4 jaw capability cause when I start with some castings they are not all consistent and the concentricity requirement for the finished product is like .0005 TIR. Not all of us have $100,000 to spend or the guts to go to the bank. Being as I can produce more parts than you with both my hands tied behind my back on a manual lathe, I thought its time for me to go to something that can go at least 40 IPM and hit point to point, or something that can give me exactly the SFM that I need, and something that I can program curves and angles into, and above all else take many light cuts instead of relying on rough cuts. Even if I have to program back tapers into the G code that is also something that I can use. I thought about adding some servos to my lathe but the Bolton costs about what it will cost me for ballscrews servos and a freq drive and misc. We aren't all made of money.



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    John's Toolroom, this recession has driven the cost of used machinery to very low prices. I would suggest going to your local used dealer and finding what he has to offer. Then once you find a suitable model use the google search, and ebay to find out what they are selling for. Some dealers will offer a warranty. Also check for what others think of the machine, any maintenance issues and availability of parts. I have what I call a decently equipped shop with 4 CNCs, I can make watch parts, and parts up to 6" diameter and do 3 axis milling and some 4 axis. I would say my machinery value is less than $100,000 with everything including support equipment, the oldest CNC 1993, the newest 2001. In the last 4 years my repair bills have totaled $3500 and most of that is because I was stupid enough to buy a machining center with a Yasnac controller. It is better to buy good used than crappy new. I have a TC1 Takisawa CNC Lathe with a Fanuc OT, that has a 6" x 15" capacity 10hp motor, 12 station turret and chip conveyer circa 1993 that I paid $12,500 for in 2005. 6 years of hard use and I replaced an encoder belt $35, sensor $65 and a control board $700. It came with a 6" chuck, and 16C closer and collets. That thing is probably worth $8500 or less in today's market. Cheap new will not be as well made as older machines. My negative comments were not directed at you, hope you didn't take offense. They were meant to the guy who is obviously trying to sell them. I would just make a post telling people what you need, I am sure everyone will share their suggestions on what is good and what is bad.



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