Glowforge, Too good to be true? - Page 4


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Thread: Glowforge, Too good to be true?

  1. #37
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    Default Re: Glowforge, Too good to be true?

    Quote Originally Posted by daniellyall View Post
    dharmic that's correct, the beta should have finished before they started the kickstarter.
    Glowforge was never sold on Kickstarter, but perhaps you were using that as a generic term for crowdfunding, like saying Kleenix for tissue. Nonetheless, being loose with terms or getting facts wrong can cost your opinion credibility. I do agree that they should have been much further along in development than they were before they started the pre-order campaign. I also think think they could have been a lot clearer with the language in their periodic status reports and should have been emailing those out to buyers instead of posting them only on their private forum, often in passing.



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    Default Re: Glowforge, Too good to be true?

    Quote Originally Posted by godfrey View Post
    I've started with a K40 ($291) and have purchased a AWC708C plus ($415) and three Gecko Drive G201X's ($310) and a Light Object Powered Z Table ($195). I haven't bought different optics, accessories, etc -- but I figure by the time I'm done, I'll be well over $1,600+.

    I certainly don't expect the Glowforge or any other Chinese imports to perform like an Epilog. When you buy an Epilog, you're buying an RF CO2 laser (as opposed to HV glass tube) and their software. The machine is almost ready to go out of the box. With the ones we have (or built), we have to either reengineer or build our own...figure out the software and have lots of trial and errors.

    I'll have a proper chiller for my K40 by the time I'm done. What does the Glowforge have to cool its tube, radiators and a fan? I don't have to depend on a cloud based service to use my machine.

    I think their concept is great. It enables people to get into this for not too much money...but I think there will be challenges for those who try to use it. It's no different than my FlashForge Creator Pro 3D printer. I've had loads of failed prints, so I had to experiment before I got it right...and that took hours. I think it'll be frustrating to people. They market it like it's a three step process (buy it, load your material and you're done). It's not that easy. It's just not.


    Not everyone is willing to (or capable of) tinkering with mechanical and electrical components like we are in this community. They'll expect it to work flawlessly forever. Just my opinion.
    Thanks for your comments. You made some good points that had me researching technical issues that were new to me. I wasn't able to find a list price for Epilog lasers, which usually means a premium price. Judging from Ebay asking prices for used Epilog lasers, it looks like a new Epilog Legend would be about twice the cost of a pre-order Pro-model Glowforge that includes the filter and comes with liquid-based cooling though I'm not sure if that uses a chiller or just some sort of fanned heat exchanger. $4k for the Glowforge Pro+filter was just doable for me - $8k is pretty much out of the question.

    I understand the attraction of the import K40-style and Red Sail laser cutters, especially for folks that have some technical knowledge. I could probably muddle through with one of those, but am at that point in life where I'd rather be working on other projects than tweaking and tuning a laser cutter. I've seen lot of folks that tried this approach and don't have a useful tool months down the road. That's one of the reasons I opted for a mostly turnkey CNC lathe and mill, and 3D printer, though each was more than the DIY versions would have been. CNC-ing my surface grinder is still on my to-do list and that is 8 years after the thought 1st presented itself. A number of pre-order buyers have already started discussing hacks for the GF and I'll probably try that sort of thing myself.

    I'm hoping that the GF will be relatively painless to use, though that remains to be seen. It appears that they will still have a few software features to implement after the initial release but the basic run of the mill stuff should be functional. One advantage of the cloud-based control system is that updates get distributed pretty much immediately. That's nice, but I'd rather have perpetually licensed software that runs from my HD, especially in a case like this with a new manufacturer that could disappear over night.

    The next month or so should prove whether or not this was a waste of time. If they don't release by then they will lose a number of their pre-orders, especially if the FSL Muse is any good.



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    Default Re: Glowforge, Too good to be true?

    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelHenry View Post
    I wasn't able to find a list price for Epilog lasers, which usually means a premium price. Judging from Ebay asking prices for used Epilog lasers, it looks like a new Epilog Legend would be about twice the cost of a pre-order Pro-model Glowforge.

    I'd recommend the Epilog Mini 18 or Mini 24. I believe you can get these for well under $20,000 depending on your power requirements, and they have less expensive models that go for under $10k like the Zing series. You'd be getting a machine ready to go with great software and actual support of the product. I highly doubt Glowforge would provide handheld support and I know most of the Chinese vendors won't care who you are after the sale. The major differences between the Chinese models (including Glowforge) is that they use HV glass tubes. Epilog machines do not. They use an RF CO2 tube with a folded cavity which makes it half the size, plus there's no glass to break, no water cooling required below 100 Watts, no high voltage (no 28,000 volts to worry about), servo driven gantry versus stepper, loads of software options ----- the list goes on.

    But if you can't justify spending that amount, you're stuck with overseas brands that will require you to babysit every job.

    Give Epilog a call. 303-277-1188 See if they have any used units from customers who've upgraded.



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    Default Re: Glowforge, Too good to be true?

    I wanted to add (since I can't edit my post... ಠ_ಠ)

    I'd hold off and let the first units fail. If you're determined to have a pretty, plastic machine (it's flammable!), then you can always order one later and I'm sure they'll still cost the same. As far as I've seen on their crowd funding champaign, the price never went up.

    I have little to no faith in their product. Sure, it's neat, but it's not new. There are a few others on the market that employ the same tech behind Glowforge. Plus, it's not a freakin' 3D printer or any kind of "printer" like they market it.



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    Default Re: Glowforge, Too good to be true?

    As far as I've seen on their crowd funding champaign, the price never went up.
    I believe that the price has actually gone up substantially.

    Gerry

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    Default Re: Glowforge, Too good to be true?

    Quote Originally Posted by fixtureman1 View Post
    I have a GWeike that I bought for about the same money but I have been using it to make money not like the Glowforge that no one has yet. Mine has a steel case and I can run it even without internet.
    Which model did you get, what is the approximate cost and if you have had any problems with it, how has the support been? The LG500 Desktop model seems about as big as I could put in the location available.



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    Default Re: Glowforge, Too good to be true?

    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelHenry View Post
    Glowforge was never sold on Kickstarter, but perhaps you were using that as a generic term for crowdfunding, like saying Kleenix for tissue. Nonetheless, being loose with terms or getting facts wrong can cost your opinion credibility. I do agree that they should have been much further along in development than they were before they started the pre-order campaign. I also think think they could have been a lot clearer with the language in their periodic status reports and should have been emailing those out to buyers instead of posting them only on their private forum, often in passing.

    Also being loose with the description of the product misleading to the consumer. Calling it a printer is just an out right lie.



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    Default Re: Glowforge, Too good to be true?

    Some people call routers mills

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    Default Re: Glowforge, Too good to be true?

    A router and mill do the same thing, cut material with a spinning tool.

    A printer puts ink on paper, and a laser burns things. Very different.

    Gerry

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    Default Re: Glowforge, Too good to be true?

    Quote Originally Posted by fixtureman1 View Post
    Also being loose with the description of the product misleading to the consumer. Calling it a printer is just an out right lie.
    Well, I happen to agree with that comment, though I'd put it up to marketing rather than outright lying. Some might say its the same thing.



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    Default Re: Glowforge, Too good to be true?

    Quote Originally Posted by ger21 View Post
    I believe that the price has actually gone up substantially.
    True, the model I bought has gone up by 50%, though that's apparently suggested retail price and, according to Glowforge, distributors can adjust from there. New prices went into effect some time in October 2016, I think.



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    Default Re: Glowforge, Too good to be true?

    Thanks for all these responses fellows, really informative.

    What cutters would you recommend for a first-time buyer (and user in fact, so yeah, total noob). I have around £10k to spend. I have looked at few machines from Full Spectrum, Trotec, Epilog, Boss and a few others. I've done as much research as I can and continue to do so, but admit I find the decision-making process daunting and the burden of making the RIGHT choice intimidating.

    I want to cut (max 10mm) plexiglass, and other plastics. Want best possible quality for the money. Would need servicing, installation and training - What do you think I should go for?

    I have spoken with (and am talking to) the companies listed above, and have been encouraged by their willingness to help and their honesty.


    Can someone just tell me - Timothy, this is the best laser in that class, buy this one. Lol

    Seriously though, andy advice would be much appreciated!



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