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Thread: 110 single phase to 220 single phase.

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    Registered Nono's Avatar
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    Default 110 single phase to 220 single phase.

    I am not sure how to ask but here I go...... I need to wire a 220v motor up and am not sure how to do it, the service into my house is 110v. A dryer uses 220 I thought (the plug that I am using) but that is two 110 legs a neutral and a ground not true 220v or is it?.The motor that I have only has three wires so would I wire the black and the red to the black, neutral to neutral and ground to ground. Any constructive information would be helpfull.

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    The power to your house is 220 volt off a "center tapped transformer". That is, one hot leg is 110 volt to nuetral in the center. The other hot leg is 110 volt to nuetral in the center. And there's 220 volt between the two hot legs.

    Going by colors don't always work, but in general, one hot wire is normaly black, the other hot is red, the nuetral is white, and ground is green. A cheap multimeter to check voltages would help you out.

    Karl



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    Your motor is 220 single phase, so it only uses the two hots and the ground, NOT a neutral. Most motors can be rewired for 110 but will draw twice the current which can be too much for residential wiring, but if it's low horsepower then it might be easier in the end to rewire it rather than plugging into the dryer each time.

    CP



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    To add to the confusion - many times in residential and some commercial service, the neutral and the ground are the same potential.

    To get 220, use the two 110 legs (which are likely around 117 each) and ground, as cp8071 said.

    Scott

    Consistency is a good thing....unless you're consistently an idiot.


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    If your motor has 3 wires comming out and one of them is not green, it is possible that you have a 3 phase motor.
    often times the ground connection is not a wire, but instead a screw terminal.
    There should be a name plate on the motor or machine somewhere.
    On that nameplate there should a listing for volts, (110 or 220), frequency or Hz (50 or 60) and Phase or Ph (1 or 3), Horsepower or HP.
    Let us know what that nameplate says or post a picture of it if you can.

    Jeff

    If it aint broke, fix it till it is.


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    So am I to understand that the three wires that come off this switch are two hots and a ground. the wires are black white and green.. There isn't any wiring diagram for it. I can put in another outlet for it. How would I wire the outlet? I am thinking that an older 3 prong 220v dryer plug would sufice...

    the motor has five wires where it wires up to the switch and the switch itself has only three wires

    Last edited by Nono; 06-01-2005 at 12:12 PM. Reason: switch not motor


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    Gold Member mxtras's Avatar
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    Are you sure this is not a three phase motor?

    Scott

    Consistency is a good thing....unless you're consistently an idiot.


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    ...as others have hinted...we need more info.

    What kind of motor is this? What is it's purpose (original and also how you intend to use)? How do you know it's 220 if there is no info on it?

    If this is a euro hairdryer/blender/toothbrush then that's one thing ... if it's an industrial motor that's 20 horsepower then the answer will be completely differrent.

    So give up the info/pictures if you want the right answer.
    CP



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    Maybe this will help????

    Scott

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -220vsingle-jpg  
    Consistency is a good thing....unless you're consistently an idiot.


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    Sorry for the wait But this is a an industrial hobbies mill and it is single phase

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -switch-jpg  
    Last edited by Nono; 06-01-2005 at 12:25 PM. Reason: attachments


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    another

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -motor-cover-jpg  


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    Excellent!!!

    Yes, It's a single phase 220V motor (hard to read, looks like "22nV"). You'll notice on the wiring diagram that they label the incoming power as L1 and L3 ... those are your two hots (however they are colored). No neutral is needed, only a ground.

    Now you just have to figure out how you're going to plug it into anything. The dryer plug is a good place to start, but if you create an "extension/adapter cord" you need to be very careful since that smaller gauge wire will fry before it trips that 30-50Amp breaker designed for the dryer. Adding a new 15-20 Amp 220V circuit would be better. You'll also notice that it's hard to find a standard plug for this type circuit since it's outdated and only used for specific (high-current) things now.

    edit: Forgot to add, the diagram on the motor shows the connections for forward and reverse rotation ... if you look at that diagram and the other you'll see how the reversing switch works by changing the starting circuit between the two legs.

    CP



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