Centroid Acorn now available and is the real deal.


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Thread: Centroid Acorn now available and is the real deal.

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    Default Centroid Acorn now available and is the real deal.

    Hello all, here's a link to Marty Escarcega's thread over in the Ajax/Centroid forum describing the switch from a Mach3 parallel port system to the newly released Centroid Acorn kit. I have one coming next week for my new mill and am SO excited. If you're used to dealing with Mach's issues, this will be a welcome relief for a very reasonable price. Imagine that, control software and hardware from the same American company....who'd a thunk it would ever happen for the hobby market!

    http://www.cnczone.com/forums/ajaxcn...42320-cnc.html

    Link to the product, check it out:

    Centroid Acorn CNC controller, Step and Direction 4 axis CNC Control board with ethernet communication

    Similar Threads:
    Milton in Tennessee ya'll!


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    Default Re: Centroid Acorn now available and is the real deal.

    Quote Originally Posted by DICKEYBIRD View Post
    Hello all, here's a link to Marty Escarcega's thread over in the Ajax/Centroid forum describing the switch from a Mach3 parallel port system to the newly released Centroid Acorn kit. I have one coming next week for my new mill and am SO excited. If you're used to dealing with Mach's issues, this will be a welcome relief for a very reasonable price. Imagine that, control software and hardware from the same American company....who'd a thunk it would ever happen for the hobby market!

    http://www.cnczone.com/forums/ajaxcn...42320-cnc.html

    Link to the product, check it out:

    Centroid Acorn CNC controller, Step and Direction 4 axis CNC Control board with ethernet communication
    Looks like another interesting package to try, Centroid have always had a good control software

    Mactec54


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    Default Re: Centroid Acorn now available and is the real deal.

    This looks awesome. I personally think Tormach dropped the ball on the Path pilot system. Tried to buy just the conversion hardware and was told machine owners only. Centroid has been around awhile so this should be solid.



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    Default Re: Centroid Acorn now available and is the real deal.

    Quote Originally Posted by thumper650 View Post
    This looks awesome. I personally think Tormach dropped the ball on the Path pilot system. Tried to buy just the conversion hardware and was told machine owners only. Centroid has been around awhile so this should be solid.
    Not true at all. Path Pilot is sold separately. However there is no support for home brews. I have it. Like everything else it needs a specific computer that will run Linux well and a Mesa card. Seems like the same issues with Mach and an SS or equivalent.

    A lazy man does it twice.


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    Default Re: Centroid Acorn now available and is the real deal.

    To me, the Acorn is like LinuxCNC/PathPilot for non-Linux proficient users (such as myself). The price isn't that far from what a Mesa & its peripheral items cost and the software is known to be solid. No compatability or setup issues either. The only unexpected issue I've had is that the CNC12 software requires a Win10 PC with a single thread benchmark of 1500. A trivial & relatively low performance number to you computer lovers but I did have to get something to replace my Mach3/XP/PP machine.

    Maybe Acorn's not for everybody but a it's miracle for me!

    Milton in Tennessee ya'll!


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    Default Re: Centroid Acorn now available and is the real deal.

    I'm surprised more people aren't running their controllers on virtual machines. Windows, Linux, both easily and cheaply setup via free virtual machine software. It also vastly streamlines the software operation while letting you run a full OS in the background. I use Mach3 and have an ESS, but if I go the Linux path at some point, which I'm 100% sure I will, I'll just run the proper install on a VM. In fact I've already played around with Linux CNC doing just that. I'd need LCNC compatible hardware to make things move, but that's all id need. My PC can operate as is basically. With modern PC hardware there is no need to slimmed and optimized installs, especially when the parallel port started phase out in the late 90's. That people still use them speaks more for the need for cheap hardware than it does to some sort of desired performance. All of that said, I'll likely venture down the Acorn route eventually as well. I like good software and so I try to experiment when time and money allows.



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    Default Re: Centroid Acorn now available and is the real deal.

    Virtual machines introduce additional delays and timing issues.

    Dual boot is a different issue.

    7xCNC.com - CNC info for the minilathe (7x10, 7x12, 7x14, 7x16)


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    Default Re: Centroid Acorn now available and is the real deal.

    Quote Originally Posted by pippin88 View Post
    Virtual machines introduce additional delays and timing issues.

    Dual boot is a different issue.

    You are absolutely right. However, that effective latency is basically unnoticeable assuming decent hardware and proper VM optimization, and in some cases VM's have better drivers than can be found for standalone installs. Often, latency issues that people see, especially for Linux machines, are caused by drivers. RAM is also a big deal, and most don't spend the time understanding or relocating memory as necessary. I ran Mach 3 on my MacBook inside Parallels desktop using an ESS for quite a while. After a bit I got tired of coolant and grease and other garage regularities messing up the MacBook that I use for business management and personal activities. As a result I built a PC. Asides from the PC running windows 7 x64, there is no noticeable difference in performance. I also ran Siemens NX, Solidworks, ArcGIS, and many other fairly heavy pieces of software inside the VM on my MacBook without any real issues. I do enjoy having a 22" monitor now instead of the laptop screen, and it's nice that the PC has pretty good GPU performance (comparatively to the Mac) so running CAD/CAM, surfing the web, making tooling or setup notes, all while Mach is machining parts is no issue whatsoever. Cost for the PC was around $600 (built myself) plus a monitor. I had the GPU, it's several years old. Looking at tooling costs, fixture costs, machine costs, the PC is a drop in the bucket. As it's been so reliable, it's one less thing to worry about so that I can focus on the important stuff. Mach 3 has seen 4 days of uptime (not a single restart of the PC or closure of Mach 3) as of this morning without a single issue, the can't be said for the operator or the programming (also done by me). I try to install OS updates on Friday evenings, but do so manually, no auto-updates.

    Obviously, a VM setup is for the more technically advanced, but it's a vastly more flexible setup and suffers very few drawbacks should you be able to do it. Generally I run no less than four cores and 16gb of ram. My MacBook (late 2012) meets that and my Mach 3 PC has 24gb of ram and 3gb of dedicated GPU memory. I also use SSD main drives for both. Large data gets offloaded onto a separate internal drive either via SSD or HDD, even when the second disk is a HDD data transfer is extremely fast when the disk is not being written to as you are trying to read like is common with single disk HDD setups. The problems of old simply aren't a reality today. Linux and OSX both are very ram and processor friendly, hell the new Macs run on mobile processors basically. So when you have more robust processing and RAM to spare a VM runs in many cases like a native install and sometimes even better.



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Centroid Acorn now available and is the real deal.
Centroid Acorn now available and is the real deal.