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  1. #61
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    Default Re: benchtop precision

    I don't think that;s an issue. I did check with the complex maintanence guy and he said the floor can support thousands of pounds, probably a good idea to spread the load to several joists but lots of appliance in the house weights more than 500 pounds.



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    Default Re: benchtop precision

    Nahh.....a come-along doesn't have enough length to go up a 20 foot stair length....it'is a short lift device, either a chain or wire rope type.
    Not sure what kind of come-a-longs they have down under but they can have very long lengths here in the USA. I happen to have a chain come-along that has a 30 feet of chain. Granted that I modified it by removing the original chain and putting in a longer one, but I could theoretically put as much chain in it as I wanted. It came with a 20 foot chain when I bought it and can be bought with anything from 5 to 20 feet of chain.

    https://www.cmworks.com/Hoists/Lever...chetLeverHoist

    https://www.mfrexpress.com/chain-com...gaAuAQEALw_wcB

    I also have a cable come-a-long that came with 20 feet of cable. 20 feet of pull at 1 ton, or 10 feet of pull when double line.

    Residential stairs are only about 16-18' long unless you have 12 foot ceilings



  3. #63
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    Default Re: benchtop precision

    I can probably attach a pulley to the ceiling and use a friend's pickup truck to hoist it up. The only problem is finding a secure point to mount a pulley (I am likely to face the same problem using a Come A Long)

    But I still think disassembly is the better way to go. It gives you a chance to inspect the machine for hidden damage and allows you to know how your machine works...



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    Default Re: benchtop precision

    In a rental situation I think the problem is going to be noise transmitting through the structure of the machine and into the floor and rooms below. Weight for a 500 pound machine isn't really an issue. You could just put a 3/4" plywood over the existing floow and that would add a lot for spreading the load.



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    Default Re: benchtop precision

    I'm aware of vibrations and I do everything I can to eliminate that. If the machine is screeching and shuddering you are doing something wrong or trying to do something beyond the machine's capability. So far I have gotten no complaint and the mill creates far more vibrations than a lathe ever will.



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    Default Re: benchtop precision

    But I still think disassembly is the better way to go.
    I think it is situation dependent, and for your situation it probably is better to just disassemble the machine.

    In my last house I had my shop in the basement and had a stair that went straight from the garage into the basement. My current house has a straight stairwell going from the foyer to the basement and directly across the foyer from the stairwell is the door to the garage which has a ramp for a wheelchair. In either of these cases it is trivial to maneuver a machine on a dolly to the top of the stairs and then lower it into the basement. I do realize not all situations are this easy, but is an option if the situation fits.



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    Default Re: benchtop precision

    Hi, I moved a 10X30 lathe and a small bench top mill from UK to Australia in 1981 and stripped them down to the basics..........the machinery parts went with my personal belongings by sea in a large packing case at a cost of 2 pounds (Sterling) per sq foot, so the shipping fees were minimal.

    One thing, it pays to keep all the small parts in sealed boxes and numbered etc.....not an issue in your case, but still pertinent for reassembly......a single missing screw is a pain in the rump when you're putting it all back together.

    I do heavy lifting in my garage by attaching a 1 ton chain block with a looped rope to the roof beams and sticking a 2X4 wood prop under the lift point......the beams won't support much more than the steel sheeting and a person's weight in the middle so the prop does the necessary.

    One thing with the noise problem.....you'll get more noise from a high speed spindle that travels and is extremely difficult to damp out, and that is for hours at a time......landlords are not all that sympathetic in a multi tenant situation.
    Ian.

    .



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    Default Re: benchtop precision

    I'm not using any high speed spindle... My mill is capable of maybe 4000 RPM at the very most, and I use that to run small-ish end mills. I wish it could go as high as 10,000 RPM because it's really useful for small carbide end mills and aluminum (it's helpful for steel too, it makes the end mill last longer since it won't need to take such a big bite). But at worst the noise aren't so much that anyone is complaining.

    The lathe isn't going to go higher than 2000RPM. In fact that is the safe maximum speed for most lathe chucks. I may use the higher speed if I decide to turn wood on it (still possible) but otherwise, it's under 500 RPM.

    With regards to noise woodworking machines is actually MUCH worse compared to metalworking. You use routers that spins at over 20,000 RPM and that universal motor makes that loud whining noise that nothing blocks. I've gotten numerous noise complaints from neighbors when I was in Taiwan (I did primarily woodworking there, making guitars) because of routers and jointers. They are very LOUD and I couldn't run them between 12-2pm because in Taiwan people nap... plus dust collectors are loud too. This is also another reason why I don't do any woodworking in my apartment at all. The dust goes EVERYwhere and the noise is impossible to control. Metal chips and stuff is much easier to control and doesn't go everywhere to the same extent as woodworking.



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    Default Re: benchtop precision

    Hi.....on the rpm note, when I listed the options for the mill I bought, I went for a 1 HP BLDC motor upgrade with 2 sets of pulleys to give a maximum rpm of 7,000.

    Changing over the pulleys in my case is another issue I have to address as it's pretty time consuming after the power draw bar was fitted, so it stays in the high range for most milling and drilling ops as there's still plenty of torque in the mid rev range around 3,000.

    If wood work was on the agenda I'd probably consider a fixed gantry CNC router addition, ......I actually started building one in steel but put it on the back burner when the mill eventually arrived.........but who knows, I'm only into hobby work so nothing is cast in stone, and I might still continue with the router build as I like making things.
    Ian..



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    Default Re: benchtop precision

    Any news on the May kits yet?



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