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Thread: 10x22 Lathe: Mods, Fixes, etc...

  1. #1

    10x22 Lathe: Mods, Fixes, etc...

    Hey all!
    I got a King KC1022ML 10x22 lathe (same as Grizzly G0602) a few weeks ago, and thought I would start a thread specific to these machines. There is a great yahoo email group dedicated to them, but posts there don't tend to turn up on google... I would like to get as much information about these lathes as possible into one thread so that other people can find it.

    Similar Threads:
    Gough Custom - http://goughcustom.com/


  2. #2
    Incorrect thread pitches when single-pointing threads

    The first 'gotcha' that I ran into was an issue with cutting threads. If I single-pointed a thread it would be 'almost' the correct pitch, but not quite. 16TPI threads would come out as 16.9TPI, 32TPI would come out as 33.5TPI, etc.

    It turns out that when cutting imperial threads the gear that's attaching to the leadscrew has to mesh with the INNER intermediate gear (127 teeth), instead of the outer one. The distinction is not illustrated clearly on the threading charts and mentioned nowhere in the manual.

    To make the leadscrew gear mesh with the inner intermediate gear you take off the leadscrew gear off it's shaft and remove the spacer from behind it. Then replace the gear and put the spacer on the outside before tightening down the nut.

    On my lathe the shaft was covered in grease and so I couldn't see that there was a spacer there! It just looked like a shaft!

    If you're cutting metric threads then the reverse is true and the leadscrew gear must mesh with the outer intermediate gear.

    Gough Custom - http://goughcustom.com/


  3. #3
    Compound troubles

    The lathe in general seems to be a solid machine. It has it's weak points though and the compound is the biggest one.

    There are 2 main issues with the compound:

    1) Because it's attached to the cross-slide via locking plate with only 2 bolts, it moves a lot more than you wish it would. This is not really a problem until you decide to part-off something... Then you find out the hard way that this lathe can't part worth a damn.

    The fix:
    Make a new locking plate that uses 4 or six bolts. This mod is discussed here:

    Forum - Projects In Metal, LLC

    It looks to be a relatively simple change, although is does involve drilling and tapping several new holes in the top of the cross-slide.

    2) The height of the top of the compound versus the spindle centerline is a bit off. The compound is too high to comfortably fit any size of QCTP. The AXA (series 100) size toolposts are the best fit, but even with 3/8" tooling you still have to adjust them to basically the bottom of the range to get them on-center. If you use a parting tool holder that has an upward angle to the parting blade you'll quickly discover that you can't have more than about 1/2" of tool sticking out before it's impossible to adjust the tool to center.

    There is no perfect fix for this that I've found yet. The options are:

    * Grind some meat off the bottom of the toolholders, but this is impossible for parting holders.
    * Remove material from the top of the compound to make space. This looks to be relatively simple, but will also weaken the t-slot that holds down the toolpost.
    * Shorten the round post that mounts the compound to the cross-slide. This seems to be the best initial option as there is about 0.1" of free space between the top of the compound nuts and the bottom of the compound. Removing this space will limit your options for improving the compound locking plate though.


    Any input on how to improve the compound height situation is appreciated!

    Gough Custom - http://goughcustom.com/


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